Active Topics | Member List | Search | Help | Register | Login
The John Byrne Forum
Byrne Robotics > The John Byrne Forum Page of 2 Next >>
Topic: Accents Post ReplyPost New Topic
Author
Message
Trevor Thompson
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 13 June 2015
Posts: 303
Posted: 25 April 2019 at 9:49am | IP Logged | 1 post reply

Being from the UK I can rarely tell the difference in US accents I can tell the a Califorinan accent (well the sort of southern drawl and Valley Girl type), New Yorkers have a strong bullish accent, southerners have a distinct accent, so to minnesotan, and then there's Bostonians (well southies) which is probably my favourite American accent but apart from that I wouldn't be able to tell a Texan accent from someone in Kansas.

In fact, I thought a Phildelphian accent is the same as New York until I watched an SNL Superbowl Skit and realiesed that there's definitely a different way Philly pronounces words.

What are some of the regional distinctions forum members have noticed and what are their favourite accents?

Like I've said in the US I like the Boston accent but in the UK I like the Birmingham accent.
Back to Top profile | search
 
Ed Aycock
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 05 May 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 972
Posted: 25 April 2019 at 10:14am | IP Logged | 2 post reply

I've always wondered how Brits and others responded to our accents. 

Having grown up in Western Massachusetts (no Boston accent) with a father from North Carolina (I can barely understand some of my aunts on the telephone) and having lived in New Jersey, now Brooklyn and with good friends in the Midwest, I can say we do have our dialects and accents.

I can tell a Cockney accent from say a Mancunian accent but that's about as far as I go with British accents.  I know a Scottish accent and an Irish brogue and know that Australian doesn't sound that close but my gosh, the Brits know their accents and to me, you just sound English - just that some pronounce "th" as "f" and some say "funny" as "foony" and some drop the "h" at the start of words and that "posh" upper class accent we Americans think exists everywhere isn't so widespread.

And for a fun spin on California, the SNL skit "The Californians" is fun parody although Eve Plumb as Jan Brady had a great, breathy California accent.



Edited by Ed Aycock on 25 April 2019 at 10:17am
Back to Top profile | search | www e-mail
 
Ed Aycock
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 05 May 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 972
Posted: 25 April 2019 at 10:16am | IP Logged | 3 post reply

I remember somebody from one of the outer boroughs of New York City telling me about a book she started by stopped (by James Patterson) because it was "so retaaawwwwwhhhrrrded."
Back to Top profile | search | www e-mail
 
Brian Floyd
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 07 July 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 6311
Posted: 25 April 2019 at 10:53am | IP Logged | 4 post reply

Heidi was born in Germany (her father was stationed there), raised in Mass, and moved here from New Hampshire. Some people mistake her accent for New York.

There are different southern accents. I can tell the difference between someone from Georgia or Alabama, for example.
Back to Top profile | search e-mail
 
John Byrne
Avatar
Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 115086
Posted: 25 April 2019 at 10:59am | IP Logged | 5 post reply

I have a friend from Texas who is the only person ever to have survived calling me “Johnny”. It’s the accent that makes it work.
Back to Top profile | search
 
Ted Downum
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 21 April 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 2080
Posted: 25 April 2019 at 11:13am | IP Logged | 6 post reply

I like to think I have a pretty good ear for regional accents, and perhaps I do, as long as I keep the regions within the US, the UK, and maybe eastern Canada (I might be able to tell an Ontarian from a Nova Scotian). 

A couple of years ago, though, I got cocky while talking on the phone to a colleague with a distinct south-seas accent. I guessed--aloud, I'm sorry to say--that she was Australian; she was actually from New Zealand (and she was not pleased with me). I'm not sure I'll ever master that distinction. 
Back to Top profile | search
 
Peter Sullivan
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 16 April 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 164
Posted: 25 April 2019 at 12:01pm | IP Logged | 7 post reply

Having grown up in London, and leaving to live in the  the US when I was 30, I now find the US accents more appealing than the UK accents. When I visit “home” every 2 years now days. If I find myself in a space with lots of voices I find it so grating on my ears, it gets to the point where I have walk out of large shops or areas with this ear numbing din. When I think about it, I find it sad that I have come to this.


Cheers, Peter

Back to Top profile | search
 
Tim Cousar
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 12 May 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 1565
Posted: 25 April 2019 at 12:13pm | IP Logged | 8 post reply

I used to work with a lady who could tell what part of our county someone came from by how they spoke.
Back to Top profile | search
 
Doug Centers
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 17 February 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 3646
Posted: 25 April 2019 at 3:50pm | IP Logged | 9 post reply

After moving to KY as a teenager, from MI, my Literature teacher would ask me to read aloud more that the other students. She told me "I love to listen to you speak because this is how English should sound". 
Back to Top profile | search
 
Matt Hawes
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 16 April 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 14798
Posted: 25 April 2019 at 5:00pm | IP Logged | 10 post reply

I've had a couple of customers that frequented my shop that came from Canada. One had moved to my city some time before, but still had his accent.  The other was still living in Canada but traveled to my city for business. Listening to the both of them, I got so that I can usually pick out a Canadian on TV shows and YouTube videos. Heh.

The fellow who came to town on business once brought his wife to the shop, as they were both in the area to attend a wedding of an associate.  Her accent was particularly thick, and she was very sweet and friendly. 

I also had a customer that came from Birmingham,  England.  He was a great guy. I think he must have moved, though,  as I haven't seen him in years. 

Back to Top profile | search | www
 
Peter Hicks
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 30 April 2004
Location: Canada
Posts: 1414
Posted: 25 April 2019 at 5:43pm | IP Logged | 11 post reply

Stephen Colbert was raised in South Carolina but noted people on TV and in movies who spoke with a southern accent were always portrayed as fools. So even as a child, he purposely spoke with the same accent as the national newscasters, who were all from New York.  
Back to Top profile | search
 
John Byrne
Avatar
Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 115086
Posted: 25 April 2019 at 6:10pm | IP Logged | 12 post reply

Much the same experience my father had, deliberately shedding his Black Country accent in England.
Back to Top profile | search
 
Brian Floyd
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 07 July 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 6311
Posted: 25 April 2019 at 9:10pm | IP Logged | 13 post reply

I watched a tv show with a dialect coach when I was a kid, and took Radio Broadcasting in high school.

The dialect coach talked about how to do a southern accent and was mostly right, though her accent she used when demonstrating still sounded a bit fake. It was or less half-pronouncing the letter i in words, and dropping the letter g off the end of words. What she didn't get right is that we also talk a bit slower than others, due to being more laid back.

In Radio Broadcasting, we were taught how to speak `General American'. I haven't used that knowledge much since I graduated 30 years ago (literally. Class of 1989),  because its a royal pain to do. I actually have to speak about 20% slower when doing so. (Basically, pronouncing i fully, not dropping the g off words, over-enunciating and better diction, but there's more to it than that.)

As for the not pronouncing the letter i, there's no really way to spell it out in written form, but its true. Marvel had Cannonball, who is supposed to be from Kentucky, say `Ah' in place of `I' when talking about himself,  but that's not correct. He sounds like he has a speech impediment more than a southern accent! I shudder to hear how he'll sound in that New Mutants movie.....





Edited by Brian Floyd on 25 April 2019 at 9:15pm
Back to Top profile | search e-mail
 
John Byrne
Avatar
Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 115086
Posted: 25 April 2019 at 9:18pm | IP Logged | 14 post reply

One thing I noticed when working on ALPHA FLIGHT was how many Americans seemed not to understand Puck’s “eh”. Rather than reading it as if pronounced “ay”, they took it more as rhyming with “meh”.

(Curiously, in the outtakes at the end of OFFICE CHRISTMAS PARTY one of the actors does the same when adding a supposedly Canadian “eh” to the end of a sentence. Have Doug and Bob been forgotten?)

Back to Top profile | search
 
Brian Floyd
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 07 July 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 6311
Posted: 25 April 2019 at 9:25pm | IP Logged | 15 post reply

Some of us realized how to pronounce it to due those great Canadian tv characters you just mentioned. Loved SCTV.

Sadly, I've never seen the Bob & Doug animated show that was done about 10 years ago. But with Dave Coulier substituing for Rick Moranis, I'm not sure I want to......
Back to Top profile | search e-mail
 
Bill Collins
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 26 May 2005
Location: England
Posts: 10550
Posted: 25 April 2019 at 10:08pm | IP Logged | 16 post reply

I live just outside Birmingham, England, i have a
Black Country accent, there is a definite,but slight
difference. I work 7 miles north of my home, and there
is a definite difference in the accents of my work
colleagues, much more different than Birmingham vs
Black Country!
In the U.K. we have many different accents, and to a
Brit it`s easy to tell.
Maybe less so, than to an American.I remember an
MTV/VH1 Def Leppard docu-drama, bearing in mind that
most of the band at the time were from Sheffield, the
accents of the actors, were more "Cockney" which was
quite jarring to a Brit!
Back to Top profile | search e-mail
 
Matt Hawes
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 16 April 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 14798
Posted: 26 April 2019 at 1:54am | IP Logged | 17 post reply

Speaking of accents, here's a funny scene (starting at the 1:30 mark in the video clip) where Alan Partridge (Steve Coogan) tries to understand his friend Michael's Geordie accent:




Back to Top profile | search | www
 
Leigh DJ Hunt
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 20 February 2008
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 1383
Posted: 26 April 2019 at 4:16am | IP Logged | 18 post reply

Afraid I still hear Puck's "eh" wrong. I don't think I've ever heard a Canadian say it! Unless, is it like that vocal tic that people in Fargo (film and tv show) use?
Back to Top profile | search
 
Andrew Saxon
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 19 June 2016
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 309
Posted: 26 April 2019 at 5:34am | IP Logged | 19 post reply

I'm used to English actors being cast as villains in American TV shows and movies but, I must confess, it always annoys me when they use Australian actors to portray English characters (still villains). That's just insult to injury.  Americans might not be able to tell the difference but when these things get shown over here it is rather grating (and don't even get me started on the 'British teeth' thing - for goodness sake, it's no longer the 1940s over here in the UK...British dentistry is every bit as good as yours, I promise you!).
Back to Top profile | search e-mail
 
Trevor Thompson
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 13 June 2015
Posts: 303
Posted: 26 April 2019 at 5:59am | IP Logged | 20 post reply

Anyone from New York, here?  I've heard that the accents change from borough to borough so, for instance, someone from Brooklyn could tell another person is from the Bronx?

I wlll admit that I can definitely tell when some one is from the East End but not necessarily from North, South or West London.
Back to Top profile | search
 
Ed Aycock
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 05 May 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 972
Posted: 26 April 2019 at 6:05am | IP Logged | 21 post reply

In the US, we also get a lot of British actors cast as Americans and it can be easy to tell.  There are a few actors who are seamless but a lot of British actors hit that American "r" farrr too harrrd. 

Also easy to tell Canadian actors - especially since about 99% of the Hallmark TV movies are filmed and cast there and everybody goes "aboot" their business.
Back to Top profile | search | www e-mail
 
Trevor Thompson
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 13 June 2015
Posts: 303
Posted: 26 April 2019 at 6:15am | IP Logged | 22 post reply

The only time I can tell Canadian accents is when I hear aboot, eh, or hoose instead of house.
Back to Top profile | search
 
John Byrne
Avatar
Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 115086
Posted: 26 April 2019 at 6:40am | IP Logged | 23 post reply

It’s actually closer to “aboat”.
Back to Top profile | search
 
Peter Hicks
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 30 April 2004
Location: Canada
Posts: 1414
Posted: 26 April 2019 at 8:06am | IP Logged | 24 post reply

I have heard that Canadian actors who want to make the jump into American TV and movies have to attend a day long dialect course to get their pronounciation corrected for about two dozen key words that would give them away as Canucks.

Strangely, for a country as massive as Canada, among English speakers, I am only aware of the Newfoundland accent. Everybody else seems to speak English coast to coast with the same accent. There are exceptions for people whose native tongue is French or First Nations, but otherwise we are pretty homogeneous. But please correct me if you can think of another Canadian English accent.
Back to Top profile | search
 
Peter Martin
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 17 March 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 11504
Posted: 26 April 2019 at 8:47am | IP Logged | 25 post reply

Head up to Cape Breton. You will not hear a typical 'Canadian' accent.
Back to Top profile | search
 

Page of 2 Next >>
  Post ReplyPost New Topic
Printable version Printable version

Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot create polls in this forum
You can vote in polls in this forum

 Active Topics | Member List | Search | Help | Register | Login