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Topic: Disney/Sony Reach Stalemate On Spider-Man Post ReplyPost New Topic
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Charles Valderrama
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Posted: 23 August 2019 at 11:04am | IP Logged | 1 post reply

A recent report from The Washington Post suggests it’s Disney that's determined to walk away from the deal....

... whatever the case, I'm assuming there will be a lot of speculation this weekend over a new deal as Disney hosts its D23 Expo.

-C!
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Kevin Brown
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Posted: 23 August 2019 at 11:23am | IP Logged | 2 post reply

To put it another way, there’s a big difference between John 
Carpenter’s remake of The Thing From Another World, and 
Ghostbusters (2016)...

****************************************

Yeah, one was freakin' incredible and the other was Ghostbusters (2018).
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Adam Schulman
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Posted: 23 August 2019 at 12:56pm | IP Logged | 3 post reply

With all of the truly awful things that happen on a daily basis in our world, I just can't work up enough feeling to get upset over this.

I mean, people are planning to march outside of Sony's U.S. headquarters to demand that Spider-Man stay in the MCU.

My lord, people. March about something important!!
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Koroush Ghazi
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Posted: 23 August 2019 at 6:25pm | IP Logged | 4 post reply

 Steve De Young wrote:
You can't swing a dead cat in 50's and 60's cinema without hitting a remake. The main difference is we now have movie libraries available to us. When High Society came out, nobody had a digital copy of Philadelphia Story. Now, we can watch the originals any time we want, so the remakes are more glaring and we're more able to compare them side by side.


Sure. Here's a mental exercise you can try: name one, just ONE remake from the past 20 years that you believe will be as revered, remembered as fondly, considered as much a classic, as some of those from the '50s, '60s, even the '80s.
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Michael Roberts
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Posted: 23 August 2019 at 7:49pm | IP Logged | 5 post reply

Soderbergh’s OCEAN’S ELEVEN will likely be the prototype for heist movies for years to come. 

But you need to consider survivorship bias. For every classic remake through the years, there were probably 10 crappy ones made in the same year that remain long forgotten. 


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Brian Rhodes
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Posted: 23 August 2019 at 8:12pm | IP Logged | 6 post reply

Sure. Here's a mental exercise you can try: name one, just ONE remake from the past 20 years that you believe will be as revered, remembered as fondly, considered as much a classic, as some of those from the '50s, '60s, even the '80s.

A STAR IS BORN


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Koroush Ghazi
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Posted: 23 August 2019 at 8:14pm | IP Logged | 7 post reply

Okayyyy... I'm out :)
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Peter Martin
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Posted: 23 August 2019 at 8:35pm | IP Logged | 8 post reply

I'd suggest The Departed.

It's weird to suggest this, because it's clearly not high-brow or brilliant and the director followed it up with a load of crap, but it was a lot of fun and consequently it remains remembered fondly by me: The Mummy (1999).


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Matt Reed
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Posted: 24 August 2019 at 1:48am | IP Logged | 9 post reply

 Koroush Ghazi wrote:
Here's a mental exercise you can try: name one, just ONE remake from the past 20 years that you believe will be as revered, remembered as fondly, considered as much a classic, as some of those from the '50s, '60s, even the '80s.

Unfair question and loaded at that.  Who knew the staying power of CASABLANCA in 1955 let alone the year it was made?  THE WIZARD OF OZ was considered a massive flop when it opened and only gained its recognition decades later. I saw THE BREAKFAST CLUB 15 times in the theatre in 1985 and yet never in a million years imagined the staying power of that film and how it speaks to my nieces and nephew nearly 35 years later. If we're being totally honest, we could create endless lists of films that at the time they were released were never thought to be anything more than what they were: popular entertainment.  And yet we are now supposed to go on a "mental exercise" wherein we can magically divine which films released in 2019 will be revered and remembered?  Won't play that game because literally no one knows and anyone who thinks that they do is lying.  
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Brian Hague
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Posted: 24 August 2019 at 2:00am | IP Logged | 10 post reply

I was going to suggest the 2014 ANNIE and see if I could make Koroush explode.

Honestly though, from 3:10 TO YUMA to SOLARIS, the Pierce Brosnan THOMAS CROWN AFFAIR to the Cohen Brothers' TRUE GRIT, many remakes have people who appreciate them. I'm no fan of Jackson's KING KONG but there are many who are. The same goes for Disney's TARZAN, LET ME IN, CHICAGO, and many others I'm sure. Do these outshine their progenitors? Probably not. But many find them entertaining and memorable nonetheless. 

Will that be enough to make them "revered" and "classic?" Time alone can tell. I don't get the sense that "revering" and praising things from the past, even the recent past, is what the current generations are into anymore. 

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Koroush Ghazi
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Posted: 24 August 2019 at 9:29am | IP Logged | 11 post reply

 Matt Reed wrote:
And yet we are now supposed to go on a "mental exercise" wherein we can magically divine which films released in 2019 will be revered and remembered?


Mental exercise as in "imagine if". Hypothetical. As you correctly point out, we can't divine the future. But I also specified the past 20 years, not just 2019, so surely some of these remakes must now be reaching the point where, upon reflection, we can call them "classic"?

You don't have to answer me, that's why I referred to as a mental game. Ask yourself whether these remakes, reimaginings, reboots etc. are really of the caliber of earlier such efforts. If you can honestly say they are; that they're not largely blatant, hollow, money-grabbing pap, then that's good enough. But be honest with yourself.

There have been movies made in the last 20 years that I think will stand the test of time. Like 1999's Fight Club. It's still talked about, watched, and many of its ideas and quotes are still used frequently today (first rule of fight club...). It was a big budget film. It used big-name actors. But it was relatively original.

Are they even making films like that now? Nope too risky. Stick to the formula. Hollywood has always been about making money from an investment, but to use an analogy, before it was like a merchant bank, today it's like a retirement fund.
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Michael Roberts
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Posted: 24 August 2019 at 10:46am | IP Logged | 12 post reply

Hollywood has always been about making money from an investment, but to use an analogy, before it was like a merchant bank, today it's like a retirement fund.

———

In college, my roommate and I both took Introductory Film during different terms. My roommate’s professor taught the class as the history of auteur theory. My professor taught the class as the history of the studio system. I would understand why he’d come away thinking films now are different from the past, but from my perspective, it’s just a reversion to the norm. 
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