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Rob Ocelot
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Posted: 27 September 2018 at 6:01pm | IP Logged | 1 post reply

At the rate things are going at Ed's Vacuum Repair is going to be the fastest growing business in ABQ.   

Nacho looks to have already prepaid and taken the family group rate.

I'm pretty sure this is how Kim exits BCS but more interesting is not only the "why" she has to use Ed but in "how" Jimmy convinces her to go along with it.   In BB Saul seems very well versed in the 'asking for vacuum repair' process so I think it's likely he had to find out how to do this for someone else before.  Could be a client but it could just as easily be Kim.

It's possible Wener and Howard may have to exit the area rather quickly as well.


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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 27 September 2018 at 9:31pm | IP Logged | 2 post reply

We don’t know if Nacho got the fake IDs from Ed. It doesn’t fit the methodology we saw Ed employ in BB. Doesn’t mean he wasn’t behind it, though. It would be a clever way to bring him into the show.

On the flipside, maybe Nacho’s initial attempt at escaping to Canada with fake IDs fails, and that’s when Ed enters the picture (and also becomes acquainted with Saul).

It may very well be that Saul is the one who hooks Nacho up with Ed, down the road, Maybe Nacho will get a happy ending. I don’t quite see Kim going for life on the lam, though. That would be a bit of a cop-out, really. Setting aside the possibility of her death, I think that the emotional climax of this show is gonna come down to Kim either leaving Jimmy or having her life destroyed by her association with him. We’ll see.
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Steve De Young
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Posted: 28 September 2018 at 11:13am | IP Logged | 3 post reply

I'm sure the cartels all have guys on payroll who make fake documents.  Its a constant requirement of their operation with people going back and forth across the border, so I don't think those ID's would have required Ed.  I'm sure Nacho knows somebody who could make a couple IDs that he feels like he can trust.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 01 October 2018 at 9:48am | IP Logged | 4 post reply

Another extended-length episode, tonight!
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 01 October 2018 at 11:50pm | IP Logged | 5 post reply

“Wiedersehen”.


Another fantastic and tense episode, directed by none other than Vince Gilligan.

The opening is both hilarious and unsettling, but once we find out what the con is all about, it becomes less troubling. Kim is trying to use her grifting powers for good.

We get an origin story for Hector’s iconic bell, and of course it’s horrifying and murderous. Lalo is nice addition to the show. A charming sociopath who perhaps isn’t quite as smart as he thinks he is.

Some people have taken the whole Superlab construction subplot as filler, but I correctly deduced that it would boil down to Werner and Mike’s relationship, and how Mike would be affected by it. No more half-measures, right? Seeing the hyper-competent Mike taken by surprise is quite a shock, but it’s obvious that his friendship with Werner was a vulnerability which would end up costing him dearly. This development wasn’t exactly unforeseen, but it is satisfying to now see it play out.

Of course, the core of this episode is Jimmy and Kim. Odenkirk knocks it out of the park with Jimmy’s humble speech to the board, then takes it to a whole new level when he and Kim have their meltdown on the roof. This also marks the second uncensored f-bomb of the season!

The rooftop fight is a scene which has been long in coming. And it has several specific callbacks to previous episodes (Mrs. Kettleman calling Jimmy “a lawyer guilty people would hire” in season one, and Jimmy telling Chuck to “roll around in the dirt with me” in season two). This scene absolutely crystallizes what the past four seasons have been slowly working to establish: Jimmy has completely internalized the person Chuck always told him he was. And is his own worst enemy, as a result. He thinks everyone sees him as Slippin’ Jimmy, as a sleazy failure, and as the sort of lawyer guilty people would hire. Even Kim, who has (as she notes) dropped everything time and again to support him. Because (as she also notes) he’s always down. 

The key moment in the board meeting is, of course, when Jimmy is asked about his feelings on what the law means to him. And his reaction to the question is so, so telling, because it’s as if he’s never even thought about it. Ever. Whereas for Chuck, it was his life’s work. 


My favorite moment might just be the shrug Nacho gives when Gus sends Lalo to Gus’ office. 


Fantastic setup for what will surely be an eventful season finale. And then another agonizing year of waiting!
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Rob Ocelot
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Posted: 02 October 2018 at 12:59am | IP Logged | 6 post reply

Some people have taken the whole Superlab construction subplot as filler, but I correctly deduced that it would boil down to Werner and Mike’s relationship, and how Mike would be affected by it. No more half-measures, right? 

Mike is going to have to hunt down Werner.   This is how it starts.

Not only was I fooled about red-herring-Kai but I also thought that Werner would meet his end in *this* episode by being caught in the blast -- shades of the stories I hear about construction work for migrants in places like Dubai where there's so much money involved in a project that workers caught in wet cement are buried simply because it costs more to stop and fish them out, regardless if they are alive or dead.  While these tales are probably not factual there is a grain of truth there -- I believe the statistic was something like an average of two workers were killed on the job *per day* at the height of Dubai's construction boom.   

You also hear stories about life in remote work locations like the arctic where boredom and recklessness are bigger dangers than polar bears.  The Superlab construction site is more or less the exact same kind of situation but there's the added element that civilization is just out of reach and not 1000 miles away making bolting a much more tempting option.

About two months ago I watched this video tour of Amundsen-Scott base at the South Pole: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vrPiVT23MhA and when I saw the living and entertainment arrangements for the Superlab crew I instantly got the same sorta creepy vibe of a place that tries real hard to feel like civilization/home but falls short in an 'uncanny valley' sort of way.   I don't think I would last a week at A-S base (nor the Superlab site for that matter).  Hell, I can't go camping for more than a couple days!

Of course, the core of this episode is Jimmy and Kim. Odenkirk knocks it out of the park with Jimmy’s humble speech to the board, then takes it to a whole new level when he and Kim have their meltdown on the roof. This also marks the second uncensored f-bomb of the season!

Something about that parking garage... bad things always happen there!


Edited by Rob Ocelot on 02 October 2018 at 1:03am
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 02 October 2018 at 9:06pm | IP Logged | 7 post reply

https://ew.com/tv/2018/10/02/better-call-saul-bob-odenkirk-j immy-kim/
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Steve De Young
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Posted: 02 October 2018 at 11:29pm | IP Logged | 8 post reply

It was interesting to me that even at the end, Jimmy doesn't apologize to Kim or take anything back.  He just says that he screws everything up, which is exactly what he was saying in the parking garage, just in a different tone.  

And also, Jimmy wasn't wrong.  Kim did love him as a person, and she'd dabble in Jimmy's shenanigans now and then when she could justify it to herself, but she always kept him, as a lawyer, at arm's length.  Even when they shared an office she refused to share a practice.  So somewhere deep down, Kim did recognize that what Chuck said about Jimmy was true, she just thought she could deal with nice person Jimmy and keep herself away from the parts she didn't like.  Jimmy isn't stupid, so he could tell.

Which has caused me to think back over the whole show.  Jimmy has clearly wanted approval and recognition all along, but has he ever really wanted to change?  I mean, he was more than willing to lie, cheat, and steal to get Chuck's admiration or approval, Kim's admiration or approval, a job at HHM, or anything else he wanted.  I think his tragic flaw, which produces Saul, may be that he thinks he'll get respect and admiration based on success, rather than based on being a good man.  Whereas the people in his life who cared about him wanted to see him become a good man, and didn't care about how much money he made or what his profile was.
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Michael Roberts
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Posted: 03 October 2018 at 12:53am | IP Logged | 9 post reply

My favorite moment might just be the shrug Nacho gives when Gus sends Lalo to Gus’ office. 

----

My two laugh out loud moments in the episode involved Nacho. This one and in the nursing home, when the lady grabs her purse when she sees Nacho lingering near.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 03 October 2018 at 1:03am | IP Logged | 10 post reply

They’re both right and they’re both wrong on certain points. The rawness and the realness of this relationship really is the emotional core of the show.


...and I have the more-than-sneaking feeling that a big part of it is an attempt on the filmmakers’ part to learn and grow from the negative reaction to Skyler White on BREAKING BAD. For the record, I think Anna Gunn did a fantastic job, and that Skyler was a complex and (usually) sympathetic character. The pure misogyny and vitriol aimed both at the character and the actress is quite disturbing. I don’t quite get it, myself, but several of my friends have expressed their major dislike for the character. 

People really need to step back and look more objectively at the show, I think. Skyler was thrust into an impossible and horrific situation by Walt’s ego, lies, and manipulations. She wasn’t just some nagging shrew who was constantly trying to ruin Walt’s plans and spoil his fun.


Kim’s great likability, her warm relationship with Jimmy, and her wilingness to aid in his schemes stands in direct contrast to all of that, of course. 

And, with Jimmy’s rooftop rant, we see echoes of Walter White’s insecurity, ego, and suppressed rage. I think one of the many genius elements of BCS is how it’s echoing and repeating certain themes from BREAKING BAD, but exploring them in subtly different ways. Thematically, the story of Jimmy McGill is not very dissimilar from Walter White. A man with a wounded ego, who wants to both prove himself and receive the recognition and validation he feels he deserves. A man who carries a lot of deep-rooted pain and resentment over what he perceives as disrespect by the people around him.

Walt just went on his ego-trip by building a drug empire, whereas Saul Goodman was content to settle in a strip mall, with junkies and thugs as his royal subjects.

Of course, we saw how Walt’s character flaws led to the utter destruction of his family, and the ruination of countless lives. We don’t quite yet know Jimmy’s ultimate fate, but, despite the objective stakes being lower, the emotional cost to him seems perhaps just as high as it was for Walt.


These two shows really do feel very much like clever variations on the same themes, at times. The thing which fascinates me is just how likable Jimmy is compared to Walt. Bryan Cranston’s inherent likability and charisma went a long way towardmaking Walt’s worst behavior somewhat tolerable, but the character was kind of an ego-driven jerk from the very start. Jimmy, in the other hand, was shown to have a good heart from the start, but he also has a mischievous streak and a wounded ego, both of which cause him to constantly torpedo his chances for success. So, he’s always down. 
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Steve De Young
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Posted: 03 October 2018 at 12:55pm | IP Logged | 11 post reply

To me, the unauthorized Davis and Main commercial is a perfect example of what Jimmy's core problem is in terms of how he views the world.  He really thought that when everyone saw how successful the commercial was, everyone would pat him on the back and applaud his cleverness and ingenuity.  Because for him the rules don't matter, just the result.  And so he very confidently ends up sending Kim into the doghouse, ruining the perfect job for himself, etc.  And he really doesn't get why.  In his mind, the higher ups at Davis and Main and Howard at HHM are just all a bunch of jerks.

Which is a big part of what Chuck said about him.  He isn't malicious.  He doesn't try to hurt people (unless occasionally he decides they deserve it), he just causes all of this collateral damage to which he's oblivious.  Which is part of what makes him less horrible than Walt.  Walt was fully aware of who he was harming, he just didn't care.
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Thomas Woods
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Posted: 03 October 2018 at 1:21pm | IP Logged | 12 post reply

Back when I was going to Art Institute, a friend and I
noticed that someone had left a portable drive adapter
cord plugged into one of the PC's. He wanted to keep
it, but I insisted we turn it over to lost and found
at the library, so he agreed. I later found out that
he went into the library and acted like he lost the
cord and took it anyway.

He didn't give a crap about the person who lost the
cord, he just wanted personal gain. I think of that
guy when watching Jimmy. It wasn't just that one
incident but a consistent use of manipulation to get
what he wanted.

Jimmy has shown remorse and actually took the fall a
few times after seeing how he hurt people, like the
retirement home. But he is on the edge.

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Rob Ocelot
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Posted: 03 October 2018 at 2:05pm | IP Logged | 13 post reply

How likely is Jimmy to be successful in his appeal for reinstatement?  I'm thinking not likely, so he either has to wait another year... or?

How is "Saul Goodman" in the BB era able to practice law under an assumed name and not his real name?   How is he able to defend his clients alongside public defenders, DA's and in front of judges who knew him as Jimmy McGill?

What I'm getting at is I think the next season will be in part a 'Slippin Jimmy' scheme to engineer that "Saul Goodman" passes the New Mexico bar exam.   As far as I am aware the bar is a written essay exam and does not have an oral component.   Does anyone know if entrance to the exam requires something like a 'summary of completion' from an accredited law school or can anyone off the street apply to write the exam?   I'm sure your identity is checked at the door but as we all know in the BCS world there are ways around that.

The irony is Jimmy is going to do what no budding lawyer in their right mind who respects the law would do -- commit fraud to write the bar!

(and I think the real clincher of the series is going to be that he can never show up to collect his sizable Sandpiper settlement cheque in person as "Saul Goodman".  Yet if Jimmy McGill had just laid low and played by the rules he would have legitmately earned both the money and respect from others that he always feels he was entitled to.  No help from Chuck or anyone else, which is how he felt he had to distingish himself.) 

As for the second question of how he explains to everyone else in the legal profession that he's now "Saul Goodman", I'm not sure.   Perhaps this is where Gus Fring enters the picture and greases the wheels...  or perhaps a shill "Saul" shows up in court instead of Jimmy...
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 03 October 2018 at 2:18pm | IP Logged | 14 post reply

Which is a big part of what Chuck said about him.  He isn't malicious.  He doesn't try to hurt people (unless occasionally he decides they deserve it), he just causes all of this collateral damage to which he's oblivious.  Which is part of what makes him less horrible than Walt.  Walt was fully aware of who he was harming, he just didn't care.
++++++++

Exactly. Jimmy has a good heart and good intentions, but he just doesn’t care about rules, and sees the higher-ups around him as using methods which don’t get immediate or strong results. A conman by nature, Jimmy is all about precision strikes. Hitting hard and hitting fast, rather than playing by the rules and showing the work.

On the flipside, he went to all sorts of trouble to prepare for his reinstatement meeting, but completely left out the one aspect that they were waiting for him to discuss: Chuck. In this instance, Jimmy tried to play by the rules and show the work, and still ended up being slapped down. Which completely set him off.

In his mind, what’s the point of even trying to play by the rules, if people still won’t respect and reward him for it? Better to play the con game, and be a wolf in a world of sheep.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 03 October 2018 at 2:24pm | IP Logged | 15 post reply

How is "Saul Goodman" in the BB era able to practice law under an assumed name and not his real name?   How is he able to defend his clients alongside public defenders, DA's and in front of judges who knew him as Jimmy McGill?
+++++++

Yeah, there’s gotta be a loophole, here. A piece of the puzzle is still missing. Gilligan and Gould have said many times that the question they want to answer is, “What problem does becoming Saul Goodman solve for Jimmy McGill?”.

We’ve already seen him adopt the name initially to sell advertising time, and then to build up a client base for his cell phone gig. But the missing piece is how he gets reinstated, and why he uses the name to build his new practice. The obvious answer to the latter is that he’d already used the name to build up a brand for himself amongst the criminal element, but what about in the law-abiding world? What does being Saul Goodman gain for him in a world where people already know James M. McGill, Esq.?
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Michael Roberts
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Posted: 03 October 2018 at 2:29pm | IP Logged | 16 post reply

As for the second question of how he explains to everyone else in the legal profession that he's now "Saul Goodman", I'm not sure.   Perhaps this is where Gus Fring enters the picture and greases the wheels...  or perhaps a shill "Saul" shows up in court instead of Jimmy...

———

Too many people in the Albuquerque legal community know Jimmy (at the very least as Chuck’s brother) and Saul too visible through his TV commercials and bus ads for me to believe that no one would point out that Jimmy and Saul are the same person. Any fraud of that nature would be exposed the first time Saul ended up in the same courtroom or judge from his PD days. 

I’m sure there will be chicanery involving getting “Saul Goodman” to become a lawyer, but I doubt it will involve a secret identity. 
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Steve De Young
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Posted: 04 October 2018 at 2:32am | IP Logged | 17 post reply

We’ve already seen him adopt the name initially to sell advertising time, and then to build up a client base for his cell phone gig. But the missing piece is how he gets reinstated, and why he uses the name to build his new practice. The obvious answer to the latter is that he’d already used the name to build up a brand for himself amongst the criminal element, but what about in the law-abiding world? What does being Saul Goodman gain for him in a world where people already know James M. McGill, Esq.?
---------------------------------------------
In terms of being allowed to practice law under the name, the simple reasoning would be that he legally changes his name.  I have a feeling that in addition to his emerging clientele who know him as Saul, there will be some further reason to distance himself from Chuck's memory, possibly related to whatever happens with HHM.

Maybe, for example, Jimmy will wiggle through a loophole to be able to practice law again, and Howard will sue arguing that his shenanigans as McGill, Esq. are doing damage to HHM's good name in front of a sympathetic judge.  Jimmy will legally change his name in order to wiggle out of the lawsuit.
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Michael Arndt
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Posted: 04 October 2018 at 2:45pm | IP Logged | 18 post reply

Too many directions to go in regarding Jimmy's transformation to Saul.

Love them all. Keeps me guessing.

Also, looking forward to seeing Mike chasing down Werner.

One episode left then the wait begins for season 5.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 05 October 2018 at 10:28am | IP Logged | 19 post reply

https://www.indiewire.com/2018/10/better-call-saul-rhea-seeh orn-on-wiedersehen-interview-spoilers-1202009301/
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Michael Arndt
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Posted: 05 October 2018 at 6:07pm | IP Logged | 20 post reply

Nice interview with Rhea Seehorn.
Love how she discussed how Odenkirk and her did the rooftop scene.
Thanks for sharing.
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Brian Miller
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Posted: 05 October 2018 at 7:10pm | IP Logged | 21 post reply

I love her. 
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 05 October 2018 at 8:45pm | IP Logged | 22 post reply

She’s just fantastic, isn’t she?


It should also be noted that, on the latest BCS INSIDER Podcast, Seehorn, Gilligan, and the others really get into discussing the mechanics of that rooftop scene. I always love listening to Seehorn talk about how she approaches her role and the different types of challenges in the scenes she plays.



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Michael Roberts
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Posted: 08 October 2018 at 11:51pm | IP Logged | 23 post reply

The finale was just a series of gut punches.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 08 October 2018 at 11:52pm | IP Logged | 24 post reply

“Winner”.


...well, it finally happened. We’re here. The true origin of Saul Goodman.

First things first, though.


Mike’s arc this season has been pretty easy to predict, but seeing the actual execution (Pun!) is still very affecting. The question was, “What will turn Mike from a guy who avoids killing into Gus’ cold-hearted hitman?”. Now, we have our answer. The first half of this episode is a lot of fun, as we watch hyper-competent Mike track Werner and elude Lalo, too.

But, in the the second half, we get down to business. Mike takes it upon himself to execute Werner, and also takes pains to save his wife’s life. And you can see the soul draining right out of him, throughout the scene. Fantastic, subtle work by Banks, here. And, in a lovely parallel to the Jimmy/Kim plot, Werner doesn’t get what’s going on until it’s too late. He doesn’t see that his transgression has brought about the birth of Mike The Fixer, just as Kim doesn’t see until it’s too late that she’s brought about the birth of Saul Goodman.

Man, Lalo is indeed a psycho. Lots of fun to watch him go full-Terminator, though. And I think we all knew that poor Fred was not going to come out of the search for Werner unscathed.

Of course, the core of this episode is the death of Jimmy McGill as we’ve known him. The teaser (Chuck! Ernie!) reminds us of happier days, and also provides ironic echoes of where we know the brothers’ relationship will go. The speech Jimmy gives to Kristie after the scholarship hearing shows how he really feels, unlike the con he pulls at his appeal hearing. No one’s ever gonna see him as anything other than Slippin’ Jimmy, so why even try?

And, so, Jimmy McGill proceeds to pull the biggest con of his career. It’s a true slam-dunk of a scene on Odenkirk’s part, since you can see the wheels turning in his head (complete with veiled contempt toward Chuck and snickering insincerity at the idea of living up to the family name he already knows he won’t be practicing under), even as he gives an outwardly-convincing speech. You can see that he’s actually tapping into some of his real emotions regarding Chuck, but only so that he can use them as a tool for manipulation.

And, manipulation is indeed the name of the game, now. Odenkirk is subtly including more Saul Goodman-ish mannerisms into his performance. His hairline is now resembling Saul’s. Jimmy’s pitch for getting reinstated by saving a judge’s life is pure Saul Goodman in its presentation.

The episode’s season-ending punchline somehow manages to be both a fist-pumping moment AND a horrific gut-punch all at the same time. The shock is palpable as Kim quickly realizes that it was all a con. And that she was one of the suckers Jimmy is so proud to have deceived. This wouldn’t have happened without her help, and she knows it. She thought that Jimmy was going to use this opportunity to try and become the kind of lawyer he’d wanted to be during the early seasons of the show. Instead, his plan now is to cut corners and take it all. Jimmy McGill has been nothing but a loser, because he believes that no one will ever see him as anything but a loser. But...Saul Goodman was, is, and shall be a winner. 


Now, the agonizing wait for next season begins anew. I’m gonna start suffering from withdrawal symptoms very soon, I’m sure!
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 08 October 2018 at 11:53pm | IP Logged | 25 post reply

https://ew.com/tv/2018/10/08/better-call-saul-season-4-final e-bob-odenkirk/
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