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Daniel Gillotte
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Posted: 18 May 2018 at 2:31pm | IP Logged | 1 post reply

I rewatched Galileo 7 yesterday and it left me wondering a few things.

Is it an episode that's supposed to show that Spock and his logic is actually a bad thing? That's kind of what I thought watching it. Like, i expected that the conflict of crew being frustrated with his damn logic would be shown to have been misplaced because his dispassionate approach actually helped to save them.

I don't know why that surprised me when watching it but it did.

Anybody else have a different view?
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John Byrne
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Posted: 18 May 2018 at 2:54pm | IP Logged | 2 post reply

Garbage episode. Best ignored.
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Rebecca Jansen
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Posted: 18 May 2018 at 3:35pm | IP Logged | 3 post reply

This was before those aliens buggered off with his fascinating brain too. I liked how there was a 'that nutty contradictory Spock' type laugh at the end even though some crew members died. Maybe the writer was moonlighting from Lost In Space?
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 18 May 2018 at 4:53pm | IP Logged | 4 post reply

One of what I consider to be the three clunkers of the first season (the others being “The Alternative Factor” and “Operation—Annihiliate!”). It has a few good moments and lines, but most of the characterization falls flat. 

The shuttle’s crew only exist to challenge Spock (...a Commander and a First Officer who’s...never commanded a mission?!?!) and be insubordinate. I do like Don Marshall as an actor, and Boma has a good moment or two, but the writing is far beneath the usual quality of the first season.
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Paul Newland
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Posted: 19 May 2018 at 11:11am | IP Logged | 5 post reply

The consistency of the shuttle crew was odd.  I would have liked to know what each was hoping to learn relevant to their discipline.   Mears sole purpose was to switch on a hand tricorder WTF?  She wasn't even any help as a technician.  They should really have had two pilots, two engineers, a medic, and two physicists, each with their own experiments to run.

They were all very unprofessional though, except Scotty and Mears. 

And why can't Kirk leave search crews while the Enterprise heads to the rendezvous?

In other respects I like it.  I like that logic isn't always sensible and I like that magical sensors can't just detect a shuttle or human life forms on a planet, far preferable to NuKirk and NuScotty speaking on hand held communicators in different solar systems .
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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 19 May 2018 at 4:42pm | IP Logged | 6 post reply

I'll give it a point for some of the dialogue. 

SOLO: "Strange. Step by step I have made the the correct and logical decisions, and yet two men have died."
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Peter Martin
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Posted: 19 May 2018 at 10:51pm | IP Logged | 7 post reply

It's poor. Agree with Greg that The Alternative Factor is also a bad apple, but I am fond of Operation: Annihilate.

The Galileo Seven is notable for showing us that Kirk works best as the lead, not Spock, and for giving us 'there are always alternatives', which is probably the source of Kirk's claim in TWOK that Mr Spock likes to say 'there are always possibilities'.

Not an enjoyable episode though unless you like seeing Star Fleet crew being shitty and enjoy off-screen giants throwing spears.

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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 19 May 2018 at 11:58pm | IP Logged | 8 post reply

Agree with Greg that The Alternative Factor is also a bad apple, but I am fond of Operation: Annihilate.
++++++++

Of my three chosen clunkers, it’s definitely my most-least-favorite. Good scenes and moments sunk by some major story problems, overall. The idea of the neural parasites is properly creepy, but the flying vomit-blobs don’t do it proper justice.
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Shaun Barry
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Posted: 20 May 2018 at 7:46am | IP Logged | 9 post reply


Despite its flaws, "The Galileo Seven" is a nostalgic favorite of mine... caught it a few times in re-runs, when I was a kid, and it freaked me out every time.

It's pretty silly now, but the tension was almost unbearable, when you're only 6 or 7!



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Eric Sofer
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Posted: 20 May 2018 at 6:12pm | IP Logged | 10 post reply

I think it was best summarized by one moment. The unseen giants were HOLDING THE SHUTTLE DOWN. This is the same shuttle that launched and carried the crew from the Enterprise. I don't suppose another couple hundred kilos would be what would not only delay its launch but prevent it altogether.
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Peter Hicks
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Posted: 20 May 2018 at 7:44pm | IP Logged | 11 post reply

I love Galileo 7.  Yes, the crewmen get insubordinate awfully quick, but it's nothing we haven't seen from other crewmen of the week, and c'mon, we've only got 48 minutes of show to tell the story.  I love the examination that Spock does everything logically in a life and death situation but ends up with subordinates that hate him because he does not understand how command of humans works.  

Edited by Peter Hicks on 22 May 2018 at 9:08am
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John Byrne
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Posted: 20 May 2018 at 8:01pm | IP Logged | 12 post reply

Yes, having worked with humans for a dozen or more years at that point, Spock would be completely clueless about how to function in a command situation.

Wotta dummy!

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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 20 May 2018 at 8:13pm | IP Logged | 13 post reply

This is an effect that frequently worked its way into the third season, with Spock—proven time and again to a brilliant guy capable of things like subtlety and sly humor—somehow being unable to grasp even the most obvious human behaviors.

Super Spock and Stupid Spock are my least favorite versions of the character!
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Peter Martin
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Posted: 21 May 2018 at 11:45am | IP Logged | 14 post reply

Yeah, there are lots of other episodes that provide evidence that Spock perfectly understands how to pull McCoy's strings -- and those are better-written episodes.
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Rob Ocelot
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Posted: 22 May 2018 at 7:05am | IP Logged | 15 post reply

Perhaps this is just a case of new-itis on Spock as a character -- with even the writers and the show creator still testing the waters for how the character is supposed to act and what his limits are.   A lot of first season episodes have a 'this is the first time this has ever happened' premise (time travel, mind melds).  Spock being solely in charge of humans (and failing) is just another manifestation of this.    

Do we know how early in the first season the script for TG7 was written compared to others?

Considering how they've made canonical suggestions as to why Spock acts so off-model in both pilots I'm surprised someone hasn't stepped up with an explanation for Spock's behavior in TG7.
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John Byrne
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Posted: 22 May 2018 at 7:14am | IP Logged | 16 post reply

I think it points to the not-so-subtle racism that cropped up a lot in the handling of Spock, usually as "jokes".
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Brian Hague
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Posted: 22 May 2018 at 11:57pm | IP Logged | 17 post reply

"Galileo 7" works poorly as a segment of an overall continuity, which I know, I know Marvel fans all love and treasure more dearly than all other things in life, calling anything else "unrealistic," but really, as a single story from episodic television, I find it compelling and fairly powerful. Star Trek was still finding its legs at this point in the production order, and the idea that Spock's greatest strengths as a second banana work against him when placed in command is an interesting one. This is the Spock who advocated killing Gary Mitchell before he could become too powerful, the one who went on a somewhat spring-loaded speech about being split in half was no theory with him; This is the earlier Spock whose defining characteristic was an aggressive curiosity rather than a sly, sanguine cool making underplayed observations on the "human" condition when amused enough to do so.

The program was at an earlier stage, and I'm fine with the rougher edges of this story and the characters it portrays. Spock being the service for 15 years or so doesn't mean he's never been in command of a landing party before. It means that this situation, this specific one, is one in which his logic is failing him, and he simply sees no way out of it that is still in keeping with everything he's known and striven to promote to this point. If we would allow ourselves to accept that characters grow and change over time, not as real people do, but in sometimes sudden, base-level ways, we could fall in love with the more rough-hewn Spock who ignites the last of their fuel in defiance of everything we've seen from him to that point, because of everything we've seen from him, knowing there was no logical chance of success... There is hope for him after all. There's hope for all of us. 

Well, okay, not Lattimer and Gaetano. They're dead.

As for the creatures holding down the ship, rockets don't launch at escape velocity. While I agree the ship should have been more powerful in that scene, it was also damaged and running a type of fuel it was not designed to utilize. I'm fine with that being a problem for them to overcome, especially since they do overcome it. Doesn't the remastered version of this scene actually show a creature falling off the shuttlecraft as it climbs into the sky? I think I read that somewhere. 

I'm largely okay with "Operation: Annihilate" as well. I find the blindness melodramatic and the fix a little too cute, but having just suffered another bout with kidney stones, I am totally onboard with the suffering of the colonists and the awfulness of what's being done to them by "the flying raviolis" as I used to call them as a kid. "The Alternative Factor" is simply terrible, however. Sadly so.

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Daniel Gillotte
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Posted: 23 May 2018 at 10:57am | IP Logged | 18 post reply

Thanks guys. I generally have a sense of nuance in Trek related to McCoy, Spock and Kirk and that while they explore issues of emotionalism vs intellect or gut vs brain or whatever it's usually not entirely ham-fisted (or carrying a giant spear).
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 23 May 2018 at 4:50pm | IP Logged | 19 post reply

Spock being the service for 15 years or so doesn't mean he's never been in command of a landing party before. It means that this situation, this specific one, is one in which his logic is failing him, and he simply sees no way out of it that is still in keeping with everything he's known and striven to promote to this point. If we would allow ourselves to accept that characters grow and change over time, not as real people do, but in sometimes sudden, base-level ways, we could fall in love with the more rough-hewn Spock who ignites the last of their fuel in defiance of everything we've seen from him to that point, because of everything we've seen from him, knowing there was no logical chance of success... There is hope for him after all. There's hope for all of us. 
+++++++++

Aside from some McCoy barbs, and some of the moments with Kirk and crew searching for the shuttle, Spock jettisoning the fuel (and Scotty’s horrified-then-respectful reaction) is my favorite moment in the episode. The tag scene, with the forced laughter at Spock’s expense...less so.

I do find it a watchable and entertaining episode, but there are some writing and characterization problems which nag at me. 
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 23 May 2018 at 4:52pm | IP Logged | 20 post reply

Doesn't the remastered version of this scene actually show a creature falling off the shuttlecraft as it climbs into the sky? I think I read that somewhere. 
+++++++

Nope. Just some CG shots of the shuttle creating the contrail-flair effect in orbit before it begins to burn as its orbit decays.
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John Byrne
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Posted: 05 June 2018 at 6:34am | IP Logged | 21 post reply

The tag scene, with the forced laughter at Spock’s expense...

•••

What I came to call the Chuckle Line was so often wildly at odds with the episode as a whole. Several times the crew were laughing at the end of episodes in which literally billions of people had died. ("The Changeling", "The Immunity Syndrome", to name two.) In "Operation: Annihilate!" we get mirth mere hours after Kirk's own brother had died!

It was something I did my best to avoid in NEW VISIONS.

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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 05 June 2018 at 10:03am | IP Logged | 22 post reply

Yeah, I prefer the more subtle laugh lines which end episodes such as “A Piece Of The Action”, “The Doomsday Machine”, etc. 
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