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Doug Centers
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Posted: 15 April 2018 at 11:58am | IP Logged | 1 post reply

Oh, I was the same way with the "Can you read my mind ?" question. To myself I was "Don't you dare!"
And even to this day I hesitate for a split second when I hear it.

As for the villains, yes in subsequent viewings they are the weakest point, but that first viewing at the cinema I hardly noticed, the euphoria was too great.
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John Byrne
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Posted: 15 April 2018 at 1:09pm | IP Logged | 2 post reply

NBC news did a piece on Superman's 80th -- interviewing Jim Lee and showing his "iconic" cover for SUPERMAN #1000.

sigh

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Shaun Barry
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Posted: 15 April 2018 at 5:44pm | IP Logged | 3 post reply


"Peter Pan flew with children, Lois... in a fairytale."

And SUPERMAN: THE MOVIE is a fairytale... or at the very least, a romantic superhero fable.  And in that regard, I find that the "Can You Read My Mind" sequence (along with spinning the Earth backwards) works perfectly fine.

Can't say it ever really bothered me, and it's not the same movie without it.  Maybe us guys can easily see what Clark sees in Lois... but that sequence helps us understand what Lois sees in him!



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Doug Jones
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Posted: 15 April 2018 at 7:24pm | IP Logged | 4 post reply

There are things that still bug me. Krypton the ice planet? 

I have always been a big fan of this rendition of Krypton. It seemed like a truly alien planet. Its sterile, almost hostile native environment seemed to make Superman even more likely to embrace his adopted home. 

One of the biggest problems I had with SUPERMAN RETURNS was the premise. Even if he thought there was a remote chance some part of the planet remained intact, there was absolutely nothing about Donner’s Krypton that would make Superman want to go back. 



Edited by Doug Jones on 15 April 2018 at 7:24pm
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David Miller
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Posted: 15 April 2018 at 8:20pm | IP Logged | 5 post reply

I'm okay with "Can You Read My Mind?" Lots of Seventies films took bizarre, pointless detours that had little to do with advancing the plot, sometimes to add texture or just even placate a talent's idiosyncrasies. It was the style at the time.
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Matt Hawes
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Posted: 15 April 2018 at 9:58pm | IP Logged | 6 post reply

 Doug Jones wrote:
...Even if he thought there was a remote chance some part of the planet remained intact, there was absolutely nothing about Donner’s Krypton that would make Superman want to go back. ..


Exactly!

In fact, SUPERMAN II ended with Superman promising the President that he'll never let the President down again, after the Kryptonian criminals overtook the White House during a period when Superman was forsaking his responsibilities to live as a normal human.

SUPERMAN RETURNS, which happens chronologically directly after SUPERMAN II (Bryan Singer stated the first two films by Donner and Lester were in continuity with his film, but not the other Christopher Reeve's films)and its timeline suggests that Superman left Earth shortly after his promise to the President, when Superman discovered Krypton may not have been completely destroyed. We roughly know the time frame because the child Lois conceived with Superman happened while he was powerless in SUPERMAN II, and that child is five-years-old in SUPERMAN RETURNS. Superman in RETURNS was said to have left Earth five years before the movie begins.

About the flight scene with Lois in SUPERMAN: THE MOVIE. As a child, I didn't like it (kids often hate anything that smacks of romance, after all), but as an adult, I actually really enjoy it. As Shaun notes above, it shows how Lois thinks of Superman. I think the scene is important in emphasizing the romance between the two characters, and adds to the emotional punch later when it appears Lois has died.
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Matt Hawes
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Posted: 15 April 2018 at 10:09pm | IP Logged | 7 post reply

Speaking of SUPERMAN: THE MOVIE, one of my very favorite moments comes right before the flying scene between Superman and Lois, during the interview at her rooftop apartment. That moment when Lois embarrassingly asks Superman if he likes pink, and how Margot Kidder does that wonderful reaction as she the words leave her mouth is priceless. And the sweet way in which Christopher Reeve responds as Superman has more heart in it than any scene between those characters in film since then.

Here is a clip from the movie featuring that scene for those that want to refresh their memory:


LINK!


The particular part I refer to is at the 3:55 mark in that video clip.

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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 15 April 2018 at 10:39pm | IP Logged | 8 post reply

About the flight scene with Lois in SUPERMAN: THE MOVIE. As a child, I didn't like it (kids often hate anything that smacks of romance, after all), but as an adult, I actually really enjoy it. As Shaun notes above, it shows how Lois thinks of Superman. I think the scene is important in emphasizing the romance between the two characters, and adds to the emotional punch later when it appears Lois has died.
+++++++

This. 

A part of the film which always charms me is that Lois—hard-hitting, sassy, independent reporter—turns into a dreamy-eyed little girl around Superman. People (including me!) always praise that moment where Reeve straightens up and changes his voice for the way in which it sells the dual identity illusion. 

However, the second, unappreciated half of that equation is the effect that Superman has on Lois, which blinds her to the fact that she works in the same office with him each and every day. She treats Clark like a sweet, naive guy who’s hopelessly out of touch with her fast-paced lifestyle, and Superman with reverence and awe. It’s all a matter of her preconceptions/perception coloring how see sees “each” man and interacts with “them”. 
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Eric Smearman
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Posted: 16 April 2018 at 3:22am | IP Logged | 9 post reply

I love Superman's flight with Lois but think it would've
been better without Margot Kidder's voiceover. Williams's
"Can You Read My Mind?" melody is beautiful on it's own.

"Peter Pan flew with children, Lois...in a fairy tale."

I've said for a few years that, for me, Superman works
best as a fairy tale in sci-fi drag.
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John Byrne
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Posted: 16 April 2018 at 6:27am | IP Logged | 10 post reply

It's important to remember context. In 1978, movies were not as we know them now. Just the previous year, STAR WARS had shown that big, space opera movies could, maybe, pull big numbers at the box office. Sci-Fi was on the brink of being taken "seiously". The "fairy tale" line was the moviemakers saying "please take us seriously, too!"
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James Woodcock
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Posted: 16 April 2018 at 6:44am | IP Logged | 11 post reply

My only issue with ‘can you read my mind’ was Lois incredible strength. Her core must have been like a rock.

The poem, I have no problem with
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Michael Penn
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Posted: 16 April 2018 at 6:50am | IP Logged | 12 post reply

I agree that the success of STAR WARS was key. When JAWS was the first blockbuster back in '75, nobody was really sure that there could be another. But STAR WARS proved it and with a subject matter and style that, unlike JAWS, could and did provide a template for a host of movies trying to repeat that success in box office through a similar subject matter and style.

It's hard for those not around back then to grasp how "innocent" (i.e., not jaded, not apathetic, not dulled) audiences were when STAR WARS and then SUPERMAN came out. The magic of STAR WARS was not only that it uplifted the audiences but the source material too. SUPERMAN made an awfully good try to repeat that success, and despite the failures many have noted above, it generally did, and quite memorably.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 16 April 2018 at 9:56am | IP Logged | 13 post reply

Part of the genius of the film is that the world around Superman is cynical, but he is exactly the honest, straightforward, noble do-gooder he’s supposed to be.

When Lois asks why he’s here, he replies with the classic “Truth, Justice, and the American Way” line, and is completely serious when he says it. Her incredulous response—“You’re gonna end up fighting every elected official in this country!” is what sells the both line and Superman’s character, because it’s a properly modern-day, cynical reaction to such purity of heart. Showing that the world around Superman is realistic allows him to be the one “magic bean” of the story, the one fantasy element that the audience will be willing to buy into before losing their suspension of disbelief.

The movie depicts Superman as exactly the sort of morally-certain, pure of heart, and virtuous character he was created to be, and does so by putting him into the real world and having Lois both acknowledge the unrealness of him and swoon over him like a little girl. It could have failed miserably, but it absolutely works. 
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Brian Rhodes
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Posted: 16 April 2018 at 10:49am | IP Logged | 14 post reply

And that's why Superman can still work today. 

Over the last two decades, we've seen a lot of superhero films. And most of those heroes run the gamut from gritty to snarky. It makes the noble, earnest ones stand out. Some of the clearest examples of this have also had, from a critical and commercial standpoint, some of the most successful movies: Captain America. Black Panther. Wonder Woman. 

Interestingly, Thor, perhaps among the more analagous to Superman, played straight, didn't have the most popular solo movies. Give the guy a wacky sense of humor, though (and a Hulk), and look out.

But, for the most part, it's hip to be square. Sure, Batman's cool cuz he's all dark and grim and badass and stuff. Iron Man makes us laugh with his quirky, arrogant little jokes. Wolverine is mean and stabby and likes to say bad words. Deadpool is dirty. Hulk is mad. And that's all fine. 

But there's something really impressive about being the upright, noble, "corny" guy in a world full of cynics. Superman should be one of those guys. 




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Eric Sofer
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Posted: 16 April 2018 at 4:11pm | IP Logged | 15 post reply

And as for that moronic idea of Lois with a child...

All one need do is examine the timing. Lois got pregnant; Superman left Earth; and nine months later, Lois had a baby. Which means that she was dating someone else within a week or so of Superman's departure.

So I'm supposed to believe that Lois cared so little for Superman that when he left, she started dating again LITERALLY immediately? How much time might have elapsed? She seemed pretty hooked on him through three movies.

If there's some other explanation, I'm all ears. But that seems damned badly written to me.
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Eric Morin
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Posted: 16 April 2018 at 4:48pm | IP Logged | 16 post reply

Even worse, if Lois didn't date/have sex with anyone else
around the time of the events of Superman II and Superman
made Lois forget their time together during the movie.
Was she just left to think that she was drugged and
raped?
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Greg McPhee
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Posted: 16 April 2018 at 5:09pm | IP Logged | 17 post reply

Richard Donner, Tom Mankiewicz and Christopher Reeve made that mvoie what it was. As Donner used as his mantra during filiming "verisimilitude".

As for Lex Luthor, Hackman doesn't portray him as a buffoon or an idiot. He is constantly reacting to Otis and Miss Teschmacher.

I would also say his plan involving nuking California, and alllowing another nuclear missile to fire at a target without a care for anyone does make him pretty evil and dangerous.
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John Byrne
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Posted: 16 April 2018 at 6:22pm | IP Logged | 18 post reply

Luthor was a sociopathic narcissist with bad hair.
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Petter Myhr Ness
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Posted: 17 April 2018 at 2:24am | IP Logged | 19 post reply

But that seems damned badly written to me.
--

SUPERMAN RETURNS, which I believe you're referring to, is a case study in bad writing. And bad decisions. 
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 17 April 2018 at 9:22am | IP Logged | 20 post reply

Fun trivia I was recently reminded of: The chest Luthor keeps the Kryptonite in is the same chest (or is at the very least the same design) as the chest where Ben Kenobi retrieves the lightsaber that he gives to Luke in STAR WARS. Makes sense, as both films were shot in England within a year or so each other, and probably used the same prop rental houses.
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Brian Rhodes
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Posted: 18 April 2018 at 10:42am | IP Logged | 21 post reply

Of course, there's also the "crossover" of David Prowse being Christopher Reeve's personal trainer...

Edited by Brian Rhodes on 18 April 2018 at 10:43am
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Jeff Scott
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Posted: 21 April 2018 at 7:58am | IP Logged | 22 post reply

40 years...OH MY!!  I was 12 years old when Superman came out and the neighbor girl who was old enough to drive took me and 2 of my friends to see it at the theater.  We had NO internet back then and I had read very little about the movie so no idea really what to expect.  I remember everyone who seen it with me saying that it was a great movie, and me saying..."but it's not how he is portrayed in the comics".  I focused a lot on the differences between the comic and film at the time, but of course later I appreciated the differences.  It is one of my favorite films now, NO criticisms today.
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Ed Aycock
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Posted: 23 April 2018 at 12:02pm | IP Logged | 23 post reply

I was 7 when I saw it in theaters in December of 78.  I remember finding the beginning more serious and freaky than I had expected in a story about Superman; the Phantom Zone sequence and destruction of Krypton bothered me.  (Again, I was 7...)

It's also the first time I remember product placement in a film: Cheerios right in the camera.

Watching it as an adult is a delight even if I realized "Wait, that's not even Christopher Reeve in the first hour!"  I love Luthor's Grand Central lair.  I love the Smallville scenes and the emergence of the Fortess of Solitude. 
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Peter Martin
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Posted: 23 April 2018 at 12:10pm | IP Logged | 24 post reply

It is Christopher Reeve's voice in the first hour though!
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Peter Martin
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Posted: 23 April 2018 at 12:38pm | IP Logged | 25 post reply

There's quite a few crossovers between Star Wars and Superman The Movie. Obviously, there's the composer John Williams, but there was also production designer John Barry, who won an Oscar for Star Wars.

John Barry with George Lucas working on Star Wars:



John Barry on his Fortress of Solitude set:



  
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