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John Byrne
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Posted: 13 February 2018 at 6:00am | IP Logged | 1 post reply

PT Cruiser broke down. Cost of repairs will be about three times its current market value!

Oh, well, cheaper than a new car, right?

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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 13 February 2018 at 6:05am | IP Logged | 2 post reply

Certainly.

I was thinking about this recently. My windows wouldn't open (passenger side) a while back. It cost a bit to fix. Yet the old handle, that you used to roll up to open a window, would probably have been cheaper to fix. Maybe.

Hope you get it sorted, anyway. Someone once said to me that cars are cheap to buy. I replied, "Yes, they can be, but it's the petrol and maintenance that really hits your wallet."
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John Byrne
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Posted: 13 February 2018 at 6:10am | IP Logged | 3 post reply

Worth noting once again that this is a 2001 model, and it has just a tick over 40,000 miles on it.* So, certainly, I feel I should get a lot more use!

____________________________

*The Jag, which is a 1997, is the same!

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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 13 February 2018 at 6:14am | IP Logged | 4 post reply

If you do buy a new car, make it the Range Rover Classic, the world's best car (scientifically proven). ;-)
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Bill Collins
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Posted: 13 February 2018 at 6:24am | IP Logged | 5 post reply

My car is 14 years old and only has 22k on the clock,it
is immaculate, it`s market value is probably about
£1,000, but to me it`s a nearly new car( I bought it new
and have looked after it).If i was you J.B. i`d repair
it,you know it`s service history and how carefully it`s
been driven.
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Steve Adelson
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Posted: 13 February 2018 at 7:27am | IP Logged | 6 post reply

Similar boat, JB.  My driver is a '98 Altima with 75000 miles on it.  It has a few minor (and very slow) oil leaks that would cost about $3000 to repair, roughly the value of the vehicle. Then again, it's been very reliable for 20 years, and I could easily get another five years out of it otherwise.  Seems worth it to me.
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John Byrne
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Posted: 13 February 2018 at 8:14am | IP Logged | 7 post reply

If i was you J.B. i`d repair it,you know it`s service history and how carefully it`s been driven.

••

I thought I was clear that was my plan. No way do I give up my PT!

(I have a habit of anthropomorphizing these things. Whenever I think about selling either of my vehicles, I think about the "shock to the system" the poor things would endure suddenly being driven like real cars! Visions of BLACK BEAUTY drift thru my mind.)

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Vinny Valenti
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Posted: 13 February 2018 at 8:44am | IP Logged | 8 post reply

"I have a habit of anthropomorphizing these things."

--

Me too! My 2000 Saturn w 82000 miles had just started giving off engine warning lights. I took it in to my mechanic and he's been slow to calling me back with an estimate, which has me thinking that it's likely to be a doozy, and perhaps it's time to put it out to pasture.

But the car has actually been good to me. Every time it died on me, it died in the most convenient way possible. One time the engine stalled as I was moving and heading into a very busy intersection near my home. I happened to have the green light, so I coasted through it, and right after it was the driveway to my then-mechanic, so I just pulled it up with no engine running and left the keys in the mailbox and walked the rest of the way home.

Even more convenient was the time I was trying to drive to JFK to catch a flight for my sister's wedding in Florida 5 years ago. While I was driving on the Belt Parkway, the serpentine belt broke, which killed the battery. Luckily it was broad daylight so I just kept driving with no electronics running. As I got closer and closer to the airport, multiple parts of the system lost power - first it was the power steering, then it was the airflow regulators, causing the engine to start sputtering, etc, all the while I'm doing 50+ on the Belt. I got to the exit for long-term parking, and the engine started shaking even more vigorously. I decided to take the first available/farthest spot in the long-term lot, since I felt like it was about to die. Lo and behold, it did - just as I pulled into the spot. We ran across the lot and hopped on the Airtrain and we made our flight.

When we came back the following week, we used my Benz to boost the battery and start it up again. That gave it just enough juice to get it out of the lot make it to the nearest Mechanic in Queens - where it died once again as I pulled into the parking lot.

I feel like I owe it some care and attention as a result!
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Andrew Bitner
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Posted: 13 February 2018 at 8:59am | IP Logged | 9 post reply

We went a different way last year. Our KIA had about 121k miles on it (IIRC) and the suspension was shot--it would have needed about $4000+ to get it road-ready again, and the Bluebook value was around $1500. Given we were ready for a new car anyway, trading it in wasn't a hard decision, even though the Kia was paid off and now that's one more bill to cover each month.

C'est la vie, as Jean-Paul Beaubier might say.

Edited by Andrew Bitner on 13 February 2018 at 9:01am
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John Byrne
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Posted: 13 February 2018 at 9:18am | IP Logged | 10 post reply

…and perhaps it's time to put it out to pasture.

••

One thing I have seriously considered, for when either of my cars dies without hope of resurrection, it to have it cubed, a la GOLDFINGER, and turn it into lawn art.

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Phil Geiger
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Posted: 13 February 2018 at 9:22am | IP Logged | 11 post reply

2001 with 40K miles? Yeah, you should get a LOT more use out of that vehicle! Well worth the investment in repairs, I think. I have a 2003 Suburban with around 180K miles on it that has been acting up a bit. I've been thinking of getting a new vehicle, but repairs are still cheaper than car payments and it's still in decent shape for it's age. So I'll be holding on to it for a while longer.
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Leigh DJ Hunt
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Posted: 13 February 2018 at 12:53pm | IP Logged | 12 post reply

How come the mileage is so low JB? I guess I drive a lot but I live in the UK. Over there, driving to the next state is like driving across the country.
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John Byrne
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Posted: 13 February 2018 at 1:24pm | IP Logged | 13 post reply

I work at home. In this house, going from the bedroom to the kitchen to the Studio is the farthest I've ever had to go to work, since I turned pro. Driving, I average about 2,000 miles a year.
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John Byrne
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Posted: 13 February 2018 at 1:28pm | IP Logged | 14 post reply

Of course, I fully expect to get t-boned driving home from the garage.
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Vinny Valenti
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Posted: 13 February 2018 at 2:59pm | IP Logged | 15 post reply

BTW JB, how has the Jag been holding up? Have you ever had any of the electrical issues that they seem to be known for?*

*To the extent that it was an important plot point in an episode of MAD MEN.
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John Byrne
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Posted: 13 February 2018 at 3:10pm | IP Logged | 16 post reply

It's been a long time since Jags had electrical issues. I had plenty of problems with my 1966 MkX, but the 1997 XJ6 is basically a Ford in drag.
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Brian Miller
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Posted: 15 February 2018 at 10:25pm | IP Logged | 17 post reply

... I average about 2,000 miles a year.

******


Good lord!  I average 1200 a month!
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John Byrne
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Posted: 16 February 2018 at 8:53am | IP Logged | 18 post reply

Brought the Cruiser home yesterday. Strange experience to drive it onto the street from the repair shop. For a moment I thought there was something WRONG with it -- then I realized I was not hearing and feeling all the little bumps and squeaks I'd gotten used to!!

Like having a new car!

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Andrew Bitner
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Posted: 16 February 2018 at 1:41pm | IP Logged | 19 post reply

JB, how is the PT Cruiser? Sounds like it's generally a pretty good car.
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John Byrne
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Posted: 16 February 2018 at 1:44pm | IP Logged | 20 post reply

I love my Cruiser. Mind you, the fact that it looks like a 1940s Car of the Future won me over at first glance.

It's not a powerful car, like my Jag, but it has been very dependable.

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Andrew Bitner
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Posted: 16 February 2018 at 1:46pm | IP Logged | 21 post reply

Have to say, the style of the thing is amazing. It does look like a car that would've been seen in JUSTICE SOCIETY back when, for sure.

Thanks!
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Shane Matlock
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Posted: 17 February 2018 at 3:28am | IP Logged | 22 post reply

A good friend of mine had a PT Cruiser. He'd wanted one since they were first released and he loved the look of them. Unfortunately, the one he got ended up being a huge lemon and he didn't keep it long.
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John Byrne
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Posted: 17 February 2018 at 7:48am | IP Logged | 23 post reply

It happens. In the early Seventies my Dad bought an Audi, by any reckoning a good car. But this one turned out to have everything wrong that could be wrong. Dad finally got rid of it when the engine block cracked.
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Shane Matlock
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Posted: 20 February 2018 at 2:36am | IP Logged | 24 post reply

I had a Mitsubishi Eclipse I bought brand new that was the same way and one of the many BMW's (a 535i I think that cost nearly as much as my 3 bedroom home) that my parents have owned was a lemon as well, so it can happen with just about any brand no matter how well regarded or engineered or expensive. That said, every Honda I or my parents have owned (about 10 or so over the years) has been completely trouble free. But I'm sure there are Honda lemons out there as well, but I've been lucky enough not to get one yet. Good resale value too.

My step-dad had an Audi as well back in the 80's, the much maligned Audio 5000, which was reported by 60 Minutes as a whole line of "lemons" with a serious acceleration and braking issue. Though Audi cars are generally well engineered as are most German cars (though in my experience not as trouble free as the Japanese ones like Honda and Toyota despite being much more expensive). That Audi 5000 random acceleration issue really hurt consumer confidence in Audi for years.

It was later confirmed that the 60 minutes piece on the Audio 500 acceleration issue was based  on erroneous details and the real problem was human error because the pedals in the Audi confused American drivers because they were closer together and they were simply hitting the gas instead of the brakes. Oops. 60 Minutes never retracted their piece, which they'd even gone so far as to fabricate their own results to prove. Audi's sales collapsed and they almost quit selling cars in America. It took 15 years for Audi to recover their previous sales in the US and the the 5000 was renamed to the 100. 


Edited by Shane Matlock on 20 February 2018 at 7:03am
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Trevor Smith
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Posted: 20 February 2018 at 6:22am | IP Logged | 25 post reply

"That said, every Honda I or my parents have owned
(about 10 or so over the years) has been completely
trouble free."

**

My father-in-law had an Accord ('96, I think) that he
traded in just shy of 1,000,000 km. It's currently
sitting on a showroom floor somewhere here in Nova
Scotia, I believe.
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