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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 10 January 2018 at 8:24pm | IP Logged | 1 post reply

The British Invasion, as many will know, was a period in the 60s when the likes of the Beatles and the Rolling Stones "invaded" the United States by soaring in popularity on US shores. 

The Second British Invasion was a period in the 80s when Duran Duran and Culture Club "invaded" the United States by soaring in popularity on US shores.

Was there a third invasion? Will there ever be one? Thoughts?

And does anyone, US, UK or otherwise, have any views on either of the first two invasions?

I was surprised Culture Club took off in the US. I didn't imagine they would. There was even a THE A-TEAM episode where Boy George was set to play at a venue in Arizona - and the club owner claimed he wouldn't even be able to draw flies to the venue! 
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Bob Simko
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Posted: 10 January 2018 at 9:58pm | IP Logged | 2 post reply

I never really thought of the 80's as a second British Invasion. The first one I
can see...it influenced how US bands approached music...even though it was a
repackaging of US blues & R&B back to the States. The 80's certainly had a
LOT of popular UK bands played in the US, but I don't think the UK &
Manchester sound s drove US 80's bands to the degree that happened in the
60's.

I can't think of anything that would resemble a 3rd wave to me.
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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 11 January 2018 at 4:44am | IP Logged | 3 post reply

You make a valid point, Bob. Although "Second British Invasion" is a term, and has been used by music journalists, it probably is not comparable to the initial British Invasion.

And, like you, I can't think of anything that would resemble a third wave. Maybe you'll be getting it soon! ;-)
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Peter Martin
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Posted: 11 January 2018 at 8:19am | IP Logged | 4 post reply

The 80s invasion was a consequence of the nascent MTV needing music videos to broadcast and UK bands being ahead of the curve in terms of producing glossy, imaginative videos than US bands. Clearly it wasn't as big as the first invasion, but in the early to mid-80s there was definitely a notable influx into the US charts of new British bands. Robert Palmer, Bily Idol, The Police, George Michael, The Human League, Duran Duran, Culture Club, Tears for Fears, the Eurythmics. These acts played a major part in defining pop music of the period.


If you look at who hit number 1 in the US singles charts in 1985, British acts have a huge impact. George Michael with Careless Whisper and Everything She Wants, Phil Collins with One More Night, Sussudio and Separate Lives, Tears for Fears with Shout and Everybody Wants to Run the World, Simple Minds , Duran Duran, Paul Young, John Parr and Dire Straits all hit number one as well with massive songs (and I would argue American band Mister Mister and Norwegian band A-Ha, who also had number ones that year, had sounds that were very influenced by the British Invasion).

As for a third invasion, it does start to get a bit tenuous trying to link the bands, but there was large British success earlier this decade with Adele, One Direction, Calvin Harris, Ed Sheeran, Muse and Mumford and Sons all cracking the US market around the same time, to the extent that four of the five best-selling albums in the US in 2012 were by British acts.


Edited by Peter Martin on 11 January 2018 at 8:20am
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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 11 January 2018 at 9:00am | IP Logged | 5 post reply

I love that NEWSWEEK cover!
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Bill Collins
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Posted: 11 January 2018 at 12:51pm | IP Logged | 6 post reply

What about Def Leppard,Whitesnake,Iron Maiden,Judas
Priest,under the mass media radar invasion in the 80`s?
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Michael Roberts
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Posted: 11 January 2018 at 12:58pm | IP Logged | 7 post reply

As for a third invasion, it does start to get a bit tenuous trying to link the bands, but there was large British success earlier this decade with Adele, One Direction, Calvin Harris, Ed Sheeran, Muse and Mumford and Sons all cracking the US market around the same time, to the extent that four of the five best-selling albums in the US in 2012 were by British acts.

----

If you consider those artists, then you'd also have to consider the mid-90s with the Spice Girls, Radiohead, and the Britpop bands like Oasis. But mostly the Spice Girls. There was a period from the late 90s to the early 2000s where they kept trying to push manufactured pop bands with a similar sound.

Another mini-invasion would be the wave of mid-2000s British soul singers like Amy Winehouse and Joss Stone.
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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 11 January 2018 at 1:37pm | IP Logged | 8 post reply

The first invasion was one of a kind.

Peter has summarised the second invasion very well, specifically the need for MTV to acquire music videos.

Anything else may not be in the same league.
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John Popa
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Posted: 11 January 2018 at 4:01pm | IP Logged | 9 post reply

As Bill pointed out, there was what was called the New Wave of British Heavy Metal in the late 70's/early 80's.
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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 11 January 2018 at 4:09pm | IP Logged | 10 post reply

Yes, I wonder why that hasn't been deemed an "invasion" by the music journalists over time. It was an "invasion" in a sense.
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Peter Martin
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Posted: 11 January 2018 at 6:03pm | IP Logged | 11 post reply

you'd also have to consider the mid-90s with the Spice Girls, Radiohead, and the Britpop bands like Oasis.
-------------------------------
I think you absolutely can make a case for that.
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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 11 January 2018 at 7:25pm | IP Logged | 12 post reply

So we're now talking four invasions, right? ;-)
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Brian Miller
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Posted: 11 January 2018 at 9:55pm | IP Logged | 13 post reply

I would think the second British Invasion was the late 60s when you had bands like Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, Fleetwood Mac, Traffic, Cream, et al came upon the scene. 
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Bill Collins
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Posted: 12 January 2018 at 6:23am | IP Logged | 14 post reply

In reality the British have consistently done well in
the U.S.,the fact that the media hypes up certain styles
or bands that they deem worthy,doesn`t diminish the
success of bands they ignore.The media lead myth that
punk killed the rock dinosaurs is a similar irritation
to me! Look at the best selling albums on both sides of
the Atlantic during the punk peak...all Rock/Prog old
school bands!
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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 12 January 2018 at 6:50am | IP Logged | 15 post reply

So, next question, class: what counts as a US invasion of the UK?

I can only think of pro wrestling! ;-)
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Michael Penn
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Posted: 12 January 2018 at 8:15am | IP Logged | 16 post reply


 QUOTE:
...what counts as a US invasion of the UK?

In the 50s, the original American Rock'n'Roll acts busted into the UK first, and this prompted the responding British Invasion in the 60s.

Acts with #1 UK hits: Everly Brothers, Bill Haley, Buddy Holly, Jerry Lee Lewis, The Platters, Elvis Presley, etc...

Acts with top ten UK hits: Chuck Berry, The Coasters, Fats Domino, Everly Brothers, Bill Haley, Buddy Holly, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins, The Platters, Elvis Presley, Little Richard, etc...



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Bill Collins
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Posted: 12 January 2018 at 9:32am | IP Logged | 17 post reply

David Cassidy and The Osmonds in the early 70`s?
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Adam Schulman
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Posted: 12 January 2018 at 1:00pm | IP Logged | 18 post reply

The Jimi Hendrix Experience were a big deal in the UK before the US -- and, unless I'm misremembering, had hit singles in the UK, unlike in the US, excepting "All Along the Watchtower."

Make of that what you will. (Honestly, if there was ever a "King of Rock & Roll," Jimi was it.)
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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 13 January 2018 at 6:51pm | IP Logged | 19 post reply

What about KISS, circa May 2017? They came to my hometown. I attended the concert. That's an invasion...right?
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Peter Martin
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Posted: 13 January 2018 at 7:59pm | IP Logged | 20 post reply

Yes, Robbie, I believe many people are referring to that as the fifth invasion.

In regard to a US invasion of the UK, I'm guessing Robbie's smiley indicated he knows how pervasive US culture has been in the UK in the post-war period. Rock and Roll, Hollywood, Coca-Cola, Maccy-Ds.... To name but a few. 
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Warren Scott
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Posted: 15 February 2018 at 11:09pm | IP Logged | 21 post reply

I c an't say if there's actually been a third British invasion with the impact of the ones in the 60s and 80s. But I'm spurred to comment on a couple of the responses.
Bob is right that the 80s British music didn't have as much influence on American music. Just look at the rock and R&B acts that rose on the charts with the Brits. But the influence of the British acts could be seen in the clothes, hairstyles, films, TV and comics of the decade.
And Peter, I think it was the other way around - the creativity and popularity of the British music videos made MTV possible. The first video MTV showed was The Buggles "Video Killed the Radio Star" and Billy Idol (among others) appeared in ads encouraging viewers to tell cable companies "I want my MTV!"
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