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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 07 March 2018 at 12:58am | IP Logged | 1 post reply

“Timescape”.


A very entertaining and fun episode, although there’s not much going on, in terms of themes and subtext. As with many of Brannon Braga’s scripts, this is more of a high-concept, sci-if procedural. It’s also reminiscent of other episodes, such as “The Next Phase” (with a Romulan—not a real one, in this instance” being revealed as aware of our heroes’ presence halfway through the story) and “Cause and Effect”. Overall, however, this story is original enough not to feel derivative.

We also get to see a Runabout rather than a standard shuttle, which makes for a nice mini-crossover with DS9. And, given the fact that Picard’s nails grow when he reaches into the temporal field, it’s safe to assume that he does NOT have a bionic replacement arm from his time as Locutus.

My only real complaint is that, as with Spock in the third season of TOS, Data is suddenly not getting even the most basic human jokes, and is doing things like literally watching a pot boil. That feels a bit much like dumbing the character down for the sake of humor, rather than acknowledging his long-term growth. These moments feel more like season one Data than season six Data.

All in all, I really enjoyed this one, even though it’s not very deep. Fun and interesting, with an engaging mystery.
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Allan Summerall
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Posted: 07 March 2018 at 4:20pm | IP Logged | 2 post reply

I love the Runabouts. I wish they had been developed for TNG before DS9.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 08 March 2018 at 12:13am | IP Logged | 3 post reply

“Descent”.


As a season-ended, this one feels a bit padded and lackluster, despite having some really good beats and moments. Ron Moore’s scripting certainly helps. The opening action teaser with Hawking, Einstein, and Newton is a lot of fun, and the battle with the Borg in the first act is really, really well-done. Fast, intense, and exciting. It definitely makes the Borg more intimidating than the arguably already played-out “shuffling zombies” schtick.

It’s interesting to note that the main title and guest credits come in the opening teaser, rather than Act One. For a second, there, I thought something had been cut from the broadcast of the episode. But, no, it’s clear that they simply didn’t want to have the credits over the Act One firefight with the Borg. It would have seemed rather distracting and incongruous. The only other time I can remember seeing something like this is the opening credits of BREAKING BAD’s climactic “Ozymandias” episode coming in Act Two, so as to preserve Act One’s intense dramatic integrity and not distract from the story.

When Dr. Crusher is left in command of the ship, I do believe it marks the moment when all seven of the main characters have each had a turn in command. I look forward to seeing Crusher in the center seat in Part II, although it seems a bit strange that Picard would order nearly the entire crew down to the planet to search for two beings with a relatively limited range.

The subplot with Data and his dark emotional awakening provides nice moments for Spiner to play, although they again underline the fridge-logic horror of the character’s continued presence as a high-ranking officer. When under the influence of control of an outside force, Data is very dangerous. I do also kinda regret the fact that this episode telepgraphs the fact that Data IS being influenced from outside to feel anger. It would have been more interesting to leave things ambiguous, so as to give fans something to chew on, over the hiatus. I don’t recall the details of how Part II explains and resolved the situation, though, so I look forward to seeing how it all goes. 

The final scene is a nice, shocking way to end the season. Having Lore hook up with the Borg makes perfect sense, and I’m a bit surprised it didn’t happen sooner. We also get some nice follow-up to “I Borg”, with Picard’s moral decision to send Hugh back to the Collective being question by both himself and his superiors. 

All in all, a solid episode, but it feels like less than it could have been, despite some very interesting individual parts. And I’m not referring to the Borg and their newfound individuality!
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Rob Ocelot
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Posted: 08 March 2018 at 7:41pm | IP Logged | 4 post reply


<RO>I think it would have been more effective if Thomas Riker had been clean shaven. 
+++++++++++

<GK> Yeah, that's something else I forgot to mention!

It just occurred to me that they may have given Thom Riker a beard (other than for ease of production) to illustrate that parallel choices do happen.   Will and Thom may have decided to grow beards around the same time but for very different reasons.   Will grew a beard, perhaps subconsciously, to shed the perception that he's too young to be in command.  There's also the 'hiding' aspect of beards.  For Thom it's pragmatism -- why *not* grow a beard?  There's nothing else to do and no one to impress.   The same person (essentially) makes the same decision in different circumstances, much like identical twins who live thousands of miles apart adopting similar hairstyles.

I get the feeling they were possibly considering Frakes-as-Thom in the VOYAGER cast to get the ball rolling and capture some of the TNG audience.   It feels like Chakote was written as Thom Riker-lite, especially in how he seems to quickly fall in line as Voyager's first officer and abandon most of his Maquis affiliations.   Another way to look at it is Thom eventually rises to the same rank as Will though his own unique path.


Edited by Rob Ocelot on 08 March 2018 at 7:42pm
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 09 March 2018 at 1:31am | IP Logged | 5 post reply

“Descent, Part II”.


A satisfying follow-up, and a nice kickoff for the final season. Spiner gives a pair of great performances, and uses subtlety to convey the difference between Data and Lore. Evil Data is pretty disturbing, as are the scenes where he experiments on Geordi.

Interesting to see Hugh as a fully-functioning individual, considering where we’d left him, two seasons prior. It should be noted that the idea of the Borg individuals attempting to transition back to some semblance of their former lives is never mentioned. After all, Picard was able to reclaim his humanity after he was severed from the collective, and Seven of Nine’s journey to reclaim her humanity was an ongoing storyline in VOYAGER.

I like the subplot with Dr. Crusher in command of the ship, and her giving the nervous and inexperienced Ensign Taitt a chance to shine. I always enjoy seeing “lower decks” characters step into the spotlight, and Taitt has a nice little arc, here. Interesting to read that Barclay was originally going to fill her story role, and that budget considerations necessitated the casting of a cheaper actor.

Speaking of budget, those restrictions are clearly on display, since a good number of the battle tactics and maneuvers during the battle between the Enterprise-D and the Borg ship are only mentioned in dialogue, with no accompanying visual effects shots. Only key moments have effects shots, such as Crusher’s use of a metphasic shield (a nice callback to “Suspicions”) to hide the ship in the sun’s corona.

This episode also finally sees the end of Lore, although it feels perhaps a bit less satisfying and climactic than it should. Of course, the fallout of Data’s acquisition of the emotion chip would play out over the course of the TNG films.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 10 March 2018 at 12:19am | IP Logged | 6 post reply

“Liaisons”.


A solid episode with a lot of fun moments, but it doesn’t come together in a satisfying way. I had only vague memories of seeing it in first-run, and couldn’t remember how it ended, but I quickly put the pieces together, once the other two ambassadors’ motives had been revealed. The plot of this one just feels a little ho-hum, and the ending not quite worthwhile.

Picard’s story also feels more than a little like erotic/rapey fan-fiction, although it ends up not being quite at that level, given the climactic reveal.

Meh. Some good laughs, though. 
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 11 March 2018 at 11:00pm | IP Logged | 7 post reply

“Interface”.


Not necessarily a great episode, but one I do enjoy and appreciate for its exploration of (not) dealing with grief. The story taps into the horror of what families go through when someone just...goes missing. No answers, no evidence. The question then becomes, “When do you give up hoping, and accept the loss?”. That’s what makes the episode work for me, although both Geordi and Data do seem a wee bit out of character in order to tell that story. Although, it’s interesting (and scary) to think that Data has come far enough that he can willfully help Geordi disobey orders for the sake of friendship.

Nice to see Ben Vereen and Madge Sinclair (who’d previously played the Saratoga’s Captain in STAR TREK IV) as Geordi’s parents, although, as Ron Moore noted (according to Memory Alpha), this marked the point for him where TNG was finally played out, and needed to be over. Indeed, the show had already gotten to the point of unseen and long-lost relatives coming out of the woodwork, and that’s never a good sign for any show. That being said, it’s nice to get more of an idea of Geordi’s family background, and, until now, he’d been the only member of the main cast whose family background was unknown.

Also, it’s nice to see LeVar Burton finally get to play some lengthy scenes without the VISOR or the contact lenses! I’ve previously noted how effortless he makes acting without the use of his eyes seem, but it’s nice to see him get to show his actual peepers off. In a related vein, the whole concept of the probe-interface is a neat one, and the scenes where Burton “plays” the probe are well done. Of course, it’s both a cost-saving measure and a storytelling tool to have him do so (otherwise, it would just be another robot-on-wires, a la Nomad), but it also makes sense, in-story.
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Rob Ocelot
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Posted: 11 March 2018 at 11:46pm | IP Logged | 8 post reply

.. as Ron Moore noted (according to Memory Alpha), this marked the point for him where TNG was finally played out, and needed to be over. Indeed, the show had already gotten to the point of unseen and long-lost relatives coming out of the woodwork, and that’s never a good sign for any show. 

Heh, it's interesting that Moore said this was the point TNG needed to be over...

Especially when someone had the balls to approve a script involving a character making out with the ghost that used to rape their grandma.  Maybe that crap was already in the can when "Interface" was being filmed?

Oh, to think they could have canned TNG at Season 6...
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 12 March 2018 at 11:24pm | IP Logged | 9 post reply

“Gambit, Part I”.



A fun and fast-paced episode, if rather insubstantial. Roddenberry reportedly wanted to avoid space pirates even as far back as the original series, but the concept works well enough, here. Seeing Picard and Riker play pirate is a fun change of pace.

We also have the return of TREK alum Robin Curtis, formerly Saavik 2.0. Seems like she just can’t get away from those pointed ears.

It’s interesting to see Data in command of the ship after Picard is presumed dead and Riker goes missing. I believe the last time he was in command for a good stretch was in “Redemption”. I certainly couldn’t imagine the Data of earlier seasons doing as well in the center seat as he does in this episode.

All in all, a fun episode, but certainly not the deepest or most engaging “Part I” that TNG’s ever done.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 13 March 2018 at 11:43pm | IP Logged | 10 post reply

“Gambit, Part II”.


Another fun episode, but one definitely full of padding. Ron Moore’s script gives it more sparkle that the story deserves, and there’s a real TOS vibe, particularly during the climax and epilogue.

My favorite scene would probably be where Data chews Worf out in the ready room. There’s a subtle difference that Spiner brings to Data in all of the scenes where he’s in command of the ship. A coldness. A more authoritarian, confident demeanor. Almost like Data has “command subroutines” which kick into motion and modify his behavior when he (on rare occasion) assumes that role. Reminds me of when VOYAGER’s Doctor went for the whole ”Emergency Command Hologram” schtick. Data dressing down Worf feels very much like how Data thinks Picard would behave in that situation. He even performs a Picard Maneuver, at one point. 

The intrigue aboard the pirate ship is all pretty standard stuff, but I do like the twist-atop-a-twist of Tallera being a Vulcan extremist posing as a Vulcan security officer posing as. Romulan. We also get some interesting backstory on pre-Awakening Vulcan.

A solid pair of episodes, but not exactly the best two-parter TNG ever did.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 14 March 2018 at 10:30pm | IP Logged | 11 post reply

I only just rewatched “Descent” a few days ago, but Heroes & Icons Channel will be re-airing it on Friday in honor of the recently-deceased Professor Stephen Hawking.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 14 March 2018 at 11:05pm | IP Logged | 12 post reply

“Phantasms”.


A very good, enjoyable, and well-directed (by Patrick Stewart) episode. There are a good number of memorable/creepy images, balanced out by some nice moments of humor. I particularly like Freud diagnosing Data as having mommy issues and impotence, and Data asking Worf to look after Spot.

The overall plot is a bit wonky, with Data actually having a subconscious awareness of the creatures, but the episode is so entertaining that it really doesn’t matter. It can also be chalked up to Dr. Soong’s dream program, as is indicated in the episode. It also turns into yet another holodeck episode for the climax, but that plot device works well enough in context.

Picard’s unease at the thought of hanging around with a bunch of stuffy old Admirals is a cute subplot. So is Geordi having a cute Ensign crushing (unrequitedly) on him, which is a nice reversal of his usual romantic luck.


An episode fondly remembered from my initial viewing it in first-run, and one of the best of the final season. I just wish I’d had a cellular peptide cake to eat whilst rewatching it. With mint frosting.


Edited by Greg Kirkman on 15 March 2018 at 10:33am
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Ted Downum
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Posted: 15 March 2018 at 7:38am | IP Logged | 13 post reply

"Phantasms" gave me the creeps on my first viewing, and I am not prone to the creeps. Maybe it was Crusher drinking Riker's brains through a straw.
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Steven McCauley
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Posted: 15 March 2018 at 7:47am | IP Logged | 14 post reply

"Cellular peptide cake -- with mint frosting!"
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 15 March 2018 at 11:21pm | IP Logged | 15 post reply

“Dark Page”.


Perhaps most notable for guest-starring a very young Kirsten Dunst, this one does have some nice moments for Marina Sirtis and Majel Barrett-Roddenberry to play. It also gives some interesting new shadings to Lwaxana, rather than just having her camp things up, as usual. It’s also nice to finally meet the late Ian Troi, after he was first mentioned way, way back in the pilot.

The emotional core of the episode works very well, even if the final product is kinda “meh”. Doesn’t help that this episode, which is full of dreamlike imagery, comes immediately after “Phantasms”.
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Michael Roberts
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Posted: 15 March 2018 at 11:51pm | IP Logged | 16 post reply

Maybe it was Crusher drinking Riker's brains through a straw.

——

I had totally blocked that out of my memories. As well as the Troi cake. Now I need to forget again. 
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 17 March 2018 at 12:06am | IP Logged | 17 post reply

“Attached”.


A so-so episode based on an interesting premise: What happens when a non-unified world applies for membership in the Federation? The Kes’ paranoia is a fun little running gag in the episode, too.

The real meat of this episode, and the thing which makes it work, is the Picard-Crusher relationship, and the reveal that Picard was in love with Crusher before her husband died. Seven years into the show’s run, and we FINALLY get some real exploration of the mutual flirtation between these two. It’s a very raw and honest moment (wonderfully played by Stewart and McFadden, who always work well together), and it’s a moment that couldn’t have worked without all of those previous years of build-up.

As it is, the telepathic plot device which leads to the big scene is a fairly clumsy contrivance, but the scenes between Picard and Crusher work so well that I’m happy to overlook it. The final scene between them is also very touching and adult, as Picard suggests that they might try having a relationship, only to be gently rebuffed.

A “meh” episode which is also partially a great episode, due to the performances and the long-running character beats which are finally paid off, after seven seasons.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 18 March 2018 at 10:01pm | IP Logged | 18 post reply

“Force of Nature”.



Oh, jeez. The “warp drive speed limit” episode. On the one hand, this episode addresses, via allegory, the important topic of (and debate surrounding) climate change. On the other hand, it’s incredibly heavy-handed, uneven, and dull. Worse, the warp speed limit imposed at the end of the episode ends up being entirely inconsequential, and is only mentioned a few more times before being dropped entirely. 

Meanwhile, Spot has jarringly shifted gender from male to female. I doubt that cats born as one gender would find themselves identifying as another, so I can only conclude that Data’s pet-parenting techniques are lacking, and that this is Spot II. Or III. Or IV. Maybe Data petted the first few Spots too hard with his superior android strength.

But, as a cat person, I greatly enjoyed the Spot B-story in this episode. Having tamed a feral cat or two, I can definitively state that the way to any cat’s heart is through its stomach. Cats can be trained. It just takes time, food, and patience. And they still own you, rather than vice versa.


Anyway, this is an episode with good intentions, but ends up being one of the weakest of the season.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 19 March 2018 at 9:15pm | IP Logged | 19 post reply

“Inheritance”.


A solid episode, but the shoehorning of still more androids and a mother into Data’s past kinda irks me. I’d been under the impression that NEMESIS’ B-4 was a out-of-the-blue retcon, but the foundation for him is laid in this episode. 

I’d also completely forgotten the big twist in this episode. It’s a neat, and provides a nice story for Data, but there are problems. Firstly, it seems no one’s gonna bother to tell Pran Tainer that’s he’s married to Dr. Soong’s sexbot. Second, it seems that Dr. Soong never bothered to research the work of Dr. Roger Korby and the human-to-android transference technology on Exo III.

It’s nice to again see Spiner playing Dr. Soong (and he’s been at a different age, each time we’ve seen him), but the retconning of a wife into his story feels more than a bit forced.

Also, I’d like to hear Data scream, “She’s my sister AND my mother!”.


An enjoyable episode, but somewhat lacking, overall.
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Brian Hague
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Posted: 19 March 2018 at 9:20pm | IP Logged | 20 post reply

"Forget it, Jean-Luc. It's Chinatown."

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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 21 March 2018 at 12:26am | IP Logged | 21 post reply

“Parallels”.


A weak episode which has some good ideas and moments. The guest appearance by Wil Wheaton as Lt. Crusher was a pleasant surprise. I also appreciated some of the more subtle details changing between universes, such as Data’s eye color.

The heart of the episode is the development of the Worf-Troi relationship, which had been hinted at over the past two seasons, starting with “Ethics” (which is referenced here). I’m not particularly fond of them as a couple, and neither was Frakes. Of course, the budding relationship had fizzled out by the time of the TNG movies. 

A “meh” episode with some memorable images and moments (such as the aforementioned return—sort of—of Wesley Crusher, the Cardassian Bridge officer, and the multiple Enterprise-Ds popping into one reality).
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Ted Downum
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Posted: 21 March 2018 at 7:27am | IP Logged | 22 post reply

I agree with you, Greg, about the Worf-Troi relationship. Still, I liked "Parallels," which I thought was great fun in an old-fashioned, pre-Crisis DC Universe kind of way. Parallel-universe stories had already been done better on TNG ("Yesterday's Enterprise"), but here we got intriguing glimpses of other possible realities without chasing any of them down a rabbit hole.

My favorite of these: Insane Grizzly Riker.


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Ted Downum
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Posted: 21 March 2018 at 7:36am | IP Logged | 23 post reply

I should add that, although I hate agreeing with Roberto Orci about anything, I take some comfort in what he said about "Parallels" back in 2008: that fans can take it as "proof" that the Prime Universe still exists even after the JJ-verse calved off of it.


Of course, Star Trek had already shown us examples of changes to the past rewriting all of subsequent history, but sometimes you have to take your consolation where you find it.



Edited by Ted Downum on 21 March 2018 at 7:39am
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Rob Ocelot
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Posted: 21 March 2018 at 8:02am | IP Logged | 24 post reply

'Parallels' has possibly the worst cold open of the entire series.

Worf returns to the Enterprise and gets a surprise party.  Yay, whippy-do!

The cold open is supposed to hook you, not bore you.  There's not even a hint of the meat of the episode, or at least if there is it's very subtle.   On a rewatch it's clear Worf has already jumped realities, either before or during the opening because his "home" reality has no surprise party.   Perhaps it happened when he entered his cabin (Geordi is there) but Worf experiences no dizziness.  

I do like how the changes start off subtly and become more dramatic and divergent as time goes on -- hinting that some universes are more compatible than others (perhaps closer in quantum signature). It has some interesting implications for diverging realities that we've seen due to time travel ('Yesterday's Enterprise', 'Yesteryear', 'Year of Hell' and the first Abrams film in particular).  FWIW I never noticed the change in Data's eye colour, either on my original viewing nor my recent rewatch.

The big problem I have with this episode lies with the premise that there's something special about 'our' Worf -- that he was the only one to pass by the anomaly (possibly, but unlikely).   Then there's the issue of what happens to the other Worfs he displaces.   The dialogue doesn't make it very clear other than Deeana's distress that 'her' Worf may not return.   The only time we get a hint that Worf physically displaces his counterpart is where he suddenly appears on the bridge instead of feeling dizzy and staying in the same place.

It's amazing though, as space is filling up with multiple Enterprises not-a-one of them appears on top of another and there's no collisions.   You'd also think the computer and com systems would start locking up once the traffic between ships exponentially increases.   It's also not clear that the other Enterprises even noticed they no longer had their 'original' Worf -- though it seems likely that any that did all went to investigate the anomaly.   200 thousand+ sounds like a lot of reality swaps for Worf but perhaps once Worf displaced one of his peers they then 'caught' the same reality swapping disease (because that's really what it is).

Crazy bearded Riker just seems so out of character for him -- compare that to the similar situation for Janeway in 'Year of Hell' and a competent captain can still hold it together even when it seems hopeless.

The episode is a bit of a letdown now that we know 'our' Worf and Deeana don't end up together, though all of this does predate even Worf's inclusion on DS-9 so I guess I can't complain too much.


Edited by Rob Ocelot on 21 March 2018 at 8:05am
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 21 March 2018 at 9:48am | IP Logged | 25 post reply

My favorite of these: Insane Grizzly Riker. 
+++++++++

While I appreciate the idea that some universes might be in more dire straits, Insane Grizzly Riker seemed a bit over the top. Fun, but over the top. Alternate universe aside, I can’t quite see Riker ever being that desperate and crazy.

I do enjoy the parallel universe stuff, though. As you note, it’s reminiscent of Earth-2 and the like. 
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