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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 23 September 2017 at 11:54am | IP Logged | 1 post reply

It was sort of brought up in the episode where Geordi met the real Brahms, and she discovered her simulated counterpart, and assumed that Geordi had been using it as a sex doll.
++++++++

There's that, yes, but Geordi wasn't using it that way. The idea is brought up, but then quickly dismissed. Mind you, I have't seen that episode in years, so I may be misremembering. 

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John Byrne
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Posted: 23 September 2017 at 12:11pm | IP Logged | 2 post reply

Perhaps time for a dedicated thread?
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 23 September 2017 at 6:20pm | IP Logged | 3 post reply

Y'know, I can't help but notice that if the show's move to Thursdays had been just one week later, then THE ORVILLE would have gone head-to-head with the CBS premiere of STAR TREK: DISCOVERY.

Which would have been interesting!

Edited by Greg Kirkman on 23 September 2017 at 6:20pm
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Michael Roberts
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Posted: 23 September 2017 at 7:01pm | IP Logged | 4 post reply

Another think I liked in this episode was the subtle implication that Moclan females might be more common than the one in every 75 years occurrence that was stated. Another show might have made this a plot point to convince the Moclans that they were wrong.
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John Byrne
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Posted: 23 September 2017 at 9:10pm | IP Logged | 5 post reply

...the subtle implication that Moclan females might be more common than the one in every 75 years occurrence...

?

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Robert Shepherd
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Posted: 23 September 2017 at 10:49pm | IP Logged | 6 post reply

Steve wrote: And once it jumped over to DS9 in the form of Quark's Holosuites, it was pretty clearly a virtual brothel.

***

You beat me to it but I had recalled Quak's holosuites were all about fulfilling your deepest fantasies too.
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Robert Shepherd
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Posted: 23 September 2017 at 10:52pm | IP Logged | 7 post reply

I'm really torn by this show. I think it's pretty darn good. I honestly can't decide yet if I want the show to have more humor or more drama. Nice mix so far, i guess.

I'll be back for more episodes for sure.
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Rob Ocelot
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Posted: 24 September 2017 at 10:18am | IP Logged | 8 post reply


...the subtle implication that Moclan females might be more common than the one in every 75 years occurrence...

The subtler message I got was that you can change the cosmetic appearance all you want but the underlying genetics remain -- that a male/converted female pairing is more likely to have a female offspring.   Moclan society will continue to sweep this under the rug for decades or centuries until there's a large enough converted female population -- with the result being more frequent female births.  It will catch up to them and get to the point where the Moclans can't ignore it.


Edited by Rob Ocelot on 24 September 2017 at 10:19am
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Luke Styer
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Posted: 25 September 2017 at 1:10pm | IP Logged | 9 post reply

 John Byrne wrote:
...the subtle implication that Moclan females might be more common than the one in every 75 years occurrence...

?


Unless either Klyden or Heveena was about 75 years old and the other was about 150 years old, then in the relatively small sample size of Moclans we have seen female births happen at least somewhat more frequently than every 75 years.  If nothing else, the fact that there is a routine sex-reassignment surgery would tend to indicate that it happens more often than once every 75 years.
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Luke Styer
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Posted: 25 September 2017 at 1:12pm | IP Logged | 10 post reply

The first episode struck me as pretty so-so, but good enough as a first episode to bring me back for the second.  The second showed improvement over the first, but still left me a little skeptical.  The third was a solid hour of television science fiction. I'm in for the long haul now.
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Michael Roberts
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Posted: 25 September 2017 at 3:04pm | IP Logged | 11 post reply

Unless either Klyden or Heveena was about 75 years old and the other was about 150 years old, then in the relatively small sample size of Moclans we have seen female births happen at least somewhat more frequently than every 75 years.  If nothing else, the fact that there is a routine sex-reassignment surgery would tend to indicate that it happens more often than once every 75 years.

-----

Yep, all this. Plus the fact that the Moclan doctors never told Klyden about his condition probably indicates that there are a lot more Moclans walking around who had no idea that they were born female. It's a taboo subject, and that would skew the statistic. 
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John Byrne
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Posted: 25 September 2017 at 5:20pm | IP Logged | 12 post reply

Unless either Klyden or Heveena was about 75 years old and the other was about 150 years old, then in the relatively small sample size of Moclans we have seen female births happen at least somewhat more frequently than every 75 years. If nothing else, the fact that there is a routine sex-reassignment surgery would tend to indicate that it happens more often than once every 75 years.

So far, we know only Alara's age, 23. We've had no indication of how old anyone else is*, or if any of the aliens encountered have shorter or longer lifespans than humans. Klytan could, indeed, be 75, or older.**

Also important to remember that an average is not a precise measurement. It's... and average. Haveena could be 75, or older, or younger. Two is not a sufficient sampling to build a model.

____________________________

* Except that Mercer is perhaps over 40.

** So far MacFarlane is playing fast and loose with basic terminology. An "all male" species that lays eggs? Wouldn't that be an all female species, at least by human standards?

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Michael Roberts
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Posted: 25 September 2017 at 5:53pm | IP Logged | 13 post reply

An "all male" species that lays eggs? Wouldn't that be an all female species, at least by human standards?

------

Yeah, biologically speaking, what defines a male and female is the size of the gametes. Either the Moclans all have the same size gametes, and they'd wouldn't be defined as male or female, or they have both sperm and eggs, so they'd be hermaphroditic. 
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Steve De Young
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Posted: 26 September 2017 at 7:41pm | IP Logged | 14 post reply

The episode revealed that they aren't an all male species.  They're a species among which females are very very rare.  Other races assume they are all male because they've only ever met males.  Most likely, the rarity of females caused the species to evolve the ability for male members to take on female characteristics for the sake of reproduction.  Then, once females weren't necessary for reproduction, female traits became seen as 'defects'. 
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John Byrne
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Posted: 26 September 2017 at 8:02pm | IP Logged | 15 post reply

Not to overthink it, but based on what we know so far, being all male seems to have been a deliberate choice, some time in the not too recent Past.

They self identify as all male, and they take radical steps to ensure they stay that way.

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Jack Bohn
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Posted: 27 September 2017 at 8:14am | IP Logged | 16 post reply

I'm pinning my thoughts to the environmental pollution be especially damaging to the genes for female, either pre-fertilization, or in the egg. Also, Bortus would have been using drugs or medical procedures trying to get "pregnant."
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John Byrne
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Posted: 27 September 2017 at 9:43am | IP Logged | 17 post reply

That Klytan was himself born female adds an intriguing wrinkle. Was the female offspring a direct result of this?

Of course, since we have know way of knowing how the impregnation took place -- and, frankly, I'd rather not know! -- no degree of speculation can really answer any questions that spring entirely from our peeks into Seth MacFarlane's imagination!

He's clearly having fun with this show, and our best bet it to jump aboard and hang on!

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Jim Lynch
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Posted: 28 September 2017 at 7:48pm | IP Logged | 18 post reply

my god they even riff on the V'ger music. This show gets better and better.
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John Byrne
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Posted: 28 September 2017 at 8:02pm | IP Logged | 19 post reply

Another sci-fi cliche is addressed in pure TREK fashion.

Tho I am a little concerned about the tens of thousands who dropped dead of shock when their sky split open!

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Laren Farmer
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Posted: 28 September 2017 at 8:05pm | IP Logged | 20 post reply

Another winner. 
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Doug Centers
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Posted: 28 September 2017 at 8:24pm | IP Logged | 21 post reply

Ok I'm sold!

Truly Trekish. This hybrid sci-fi/dramedy is a winner.

Couldn't help but notice the 2,000 year parallel with the name D'rol, spelled backward...


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Shane Matlock
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Posted: 29 September 2017 at 4:03am | IP Logged | 22 post reply

This episode further shows how this show is doing Star Trek better than Discovery. This seems very much like the bright hopeful future that Star Trek was supposed to be about, but seems lost in the newer incarnations of Trek. This is a future you'd want to live in. 

Also this latest episode was very "For the World is Hollow and I have Touched the Sky."
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John Byrne
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Posted: 29 September 2017 at 5:32am | IP Logged | 23 post reply

Also this latest episode was very "For the World is Hollow and I have Touched the Sky."

Only good.

The ship-as-world concept is older than that clunky third season outing. Brian Aldiss' first novel, NON-STOP (later republished as STARSHIP) was just such a tale, in 1958.

"For the World is Hollow, and I Have Touched the Sky" seemed to spring directly from some thinking that was getting a lot of press around that time. The idea of boring into a predominantly iron-nickel asteroid, and then setting off a series of thermonuclear explosions inside it, to soften the rock and expand it like a balloon. The asteroid would then be set spinning on its long axis, and "artificial gravity" would be created. The inside walls would then be cultivated and inhabited. TREK got it wrong in execution, most likely because it was cheaper to use the non-spinning asteroid from "The Paradise Syndrome".

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David Allen Perrin
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Posted: 29 September 2017 at 12:30pm | IP Logged | 24 post reply

Any comments on the design of the Orville starship?  It kinda comes off as a possible evolution of some Federation designs to me. 

I find it pretty from a front 3/4 view, but the curved propulsion structures challenge my tastes from the rear.  I also find it odd that their shuttlecraft has to fly between those structures to clear the ship.  The designer in me wants to place that well out of the way of anything important like....the engines.





Edited by David Allen Perrin on 29 September 2017 at 12:36pm
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John Byrne
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Posted: 29 September 2017 at 1:02pm | IP Logged | 25 post reply

I like the Orville a lot. Eager for the model!!
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