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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 10 April 2017 at 1:08am | IP Logged | 1  

Well, the third season of this BREAKING BAD spinoff/prequel premieres tonight. I just finished rewatching the second season on Blu-Ray As a refresher, although AMC will be running the second season today as a lead-in to the premiere.

Love this show so much. It's everything I could want from a prequel, since it pretty much avoids Prequelitis. You're not just waiting for winks, nods and foreshadowing of BREAKING BAD, because the new story being told is really compelling and well-constructed. And, while we're slowly moving more and more into familiar BB territory, it's been a very organic and natural progression. I'm in no rush to get into the traditional Saul Goodman antics, because I really have become invested in the story of just how and why that identity came to be.

It's not required to have seen BREAKING BAD in order to enjoy or understand BCS. BCS is a much richer experience if one is familiar with BB, but BCS really does stand on its own. It still feels of a piece with BB, and yet works perfectly as its own thing. While the stakes are (so far) much lower than in BB (which was life-and-death stuff from the start), the same incredible artistry is still on display. It's a testament to the quality of the writing, directing, and acting that a run-of-the-mill hearing in front of the New Mexico Banking Board can be made to feel like high drama. 

As I have noted before, this show keeps making me forget what a cartoonish sleazeball Saul Goodman was on BB (...and I say that in the best possible way!), because Bob Odenkirk has done a phenomenal job of imbuing James M. McGill, Esq. with real depth and pathos. Wonderful cast, wonderful writing, and wonderful storytelling. The pacing is incredibly slow and deliberate, but the show rewards multiple viewings, and respects its audience's ability to follow along without being spoon-fed.

One of the best shows on TV, and, with the much-celebrated return of Gus Fring during this season, it's probably only gonna get better. Looking forward to the next few weeks!
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Joseph Greathouse
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Posted: 10 April 2017 at 9:01am | IP Logged | 2  

I have truly enjoyed the jouney we are seeing in Better Call Saul.  Knowing where he ends up on BB, and even what we see post BB in the first episode, it really is about the journey rather than the destination.

I haven't watched any BB since BCS has started.  But I am looking forward to revisiting the series, or at least the Saul episodes after all this is done.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 10 April 2017 at 10:02am | IP Logged | 3  

AMC ran "best of Saul Goodman" and "best of Gus Fring" BB marathons, over the past two weeks. I caught bits and pieces of various episodes, and found myself getting sucked right back in. I really do need to give BB a full rewatch, eventually. 

At the end of the day, BREAKING BAD ended when everything was still firing on all cylinders, and could easily have gone on for a few more seasons, I think. But, I agree with the filmmakers' decision to end it when they did, because that way they didn't risk of running out of steam or becoming repetitive. By switching gears and working different creative muscles with BCS, they've continued to maintain the same high level of quality, and have produced truly top-notch dramatic TV almost non-stop for nearly a decade, which is no small feat.

Also, one of the more subtly interesting things about BCS is the possibility that the post-BB story isn't quite over. We keep seeing present-day "Gene" living on the lam, but the showrunners have hinted that his story might not necessarily end there. 
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 11 April 2017 at 12:17am | IP Logged | 4  

"Mabel".

Well, we've hit the ground running, with the intrigue regarding Chuck's vengeful obsession and Mike's backtracking of the person(s) tracking him. 

Right from the start, it feels like we're entering serious territory. The first two seasons were relatively lighthearted and fun, but it seems that Jimmy's fraud regarding the Mesa Verde case is going to have major repercussions, especially since Kim is now very complicit in the whole scheme. And, of course, Kim has very much been the moderating influence who has prevented Jimmy from going over the edge into full conman/Saul mode. The question has often come up (as it did on tonight's TALKING SAUL) as to where she is during BREAKING BAD, since it seems unlikely that she'd stick around to watch Jimmy fully embrace a life of crime. Dead? Prison? Out of Jimmy's life? 

The whole sequence with Mike MacGyvering the tracking device in order to trace it back to its source is a perfect example of how this show is both deliciously hyperserialized and trusts its audience to figure things out without a bunch of clunky exposition. It's marvelous visual storytelling, and not unlike the seven-minute sequence from last season's finale, with Mike trying to get a bead on Hector Salamanca, only to then find the "Don't" note on his windshield. Letting long moments play out for both tension and nonverbal narrative is one of the more subtle elements which makes both BB and BCS so friggin' good. No other show goes to the trouble of taking so much time and care to examine the nitty-gritty details of plot mechanics (while also expressing character without dialogue). It lends a real sense of realism and gravitas to the storytelling. 

So glad this show is back!


Bonus points to TALKING SAUL, where Vince Gilligan made a STAR TREK reference. Both he and co-showrunners Peter Gould are old-school TREK fans, and that influence can be felt in both BB and BCS.


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Joe Zhang
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Posted: 12 April 2017 at 12:02am | IP Logged | 5  

"Bonus points to TALKING SAUL, where Vince Gilligan made a STAR TREK reference. Both he and co-showrunners Peter Gould are old-school TREK fans, and that influence can be felt in both BB and BCS."

I love BB / BCS and am fond of Star Trek ... but where's the influence? 
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 12 April 2017 at 12:30am | IP Logged | 6  

There have a been a few subtle references, here and there. Perhaps most notably the fact that the wheelchair-bound Hector Salamanca and his "ding once for 'yes', twice for 'no'" bell is an intentional homage to the crippled Christopher Pike in "The Menagerie". 

Gilligan and Gould have stated that the style of storytelling and writing of classic TREK has often been an influence in their writers' room.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 12 April 2017 at 12:33am | IP Logged | 7  

...oh, and Badger's hilarious "pie eating contest aboard the Enterprise" fanfiction script.
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Rob Ocelot
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Posted: 13 April 2017 at 6:50am | IP Logged | 8  

<Greg Kirkman> Also, one of the more subtly interesting things about BCS is the possibility that the post-BB story isn't quite over. We keep seeing present-day "Gene" living on the lam, but the showrunners have hinted that his story might not necessarily end there. 

Indeed.   One of the more interesting aspects of the show to me is how they seamlessly tie three eras of a character together: Jimmy, Saul, and Gene.   We've walked into the story in the middle and fleshing out both ends of this is an immensely satisfying television viewing experience.  Once they've filled out the prequel stuff they could easily do a season or three in the post-BB era without skipping a beat. 

They careful way they are constructing this show belies a complexity of plot and character that means new viewers can start with BCS and follow with BB or do it the 'oldschool' way.   It's pretty rare to have that kind of symmetry in weekly television series writing.

It's heads and shoulders above the sort of twisty plotting and red herrings that go nowhere style of writing that's been popular recently -- namely Lost and BSG.



Edited by Rob Ocelot on 13 April 2017 at 6:53am
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 13 April 2017 at 9:38am | IP Logged | 9  

Exactly. They've mentioned the possibility of doing an entire episode focused on Gene, so we'll see how it all goes. For the moment, the Gene segments seem relegated to being the cold open sequence of each season's premiere. 

Although, on TALKING SAUL, Gilligan did cryptically mention an upcoming episode which feels to him like "episode 63 of BREAKING BAD", so we'll see. That could mean any number of things.

One of the things that fascinates me most about the show is how it greatly deepens and enriches aspects of BREAKING BAD (namely, Saul and Mike's stories), yet tells its own standalone story which requires no knowledge of BB.

And, really, the show is operating on four levels--the story of Jimmy McGill and the people in his life, the origin of Saul Goodman, the tragedy of post-BB Gene, and the story of Mike. Also, Jimmy and Mike's stories have been running parallel to each other, with almost no overlap, but you get the sense that they're gonna slowly start merging together. Although that might be a bit tricky, since Saul apparently didn't know about Gus--at first--by the time of BB. Mike was working as Saul's private investigator and fixer, but he was also secretly working for Gus.

And I find it rather appropriate that Mike would come to Gus' attention because of their respective grudges against Hector Salamanca. That whole story in itself deepens Mike's character beyond merely being Gus' henchman. He has a personal stake in Gus' longterm plan for revenge against Hector, which is surely how Gus lured him in. After all, Mike is BCS is not yet the cold-blooded killer from BB. Something's gotta take him down that path, and the death of his son seems to have just been a starting point.

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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 13 April 2017 at 10:24am | IP Logged | 10  

Interesting interview with Gilligan and Gould:

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Joseph Greathouse
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Posted: 13 April 2017 at 11:11am | IP Logged | 11  

And, really, the show is operating on four levels...

I'm curious, regarding the introduction of Gus, if this won't add yet another level to the story telling.  Will Gus be introduced as an established power, or will we see his rise and moral fall?
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 13 April 2017 at 11:26am | IP Logged | 12  

Gilligan has indicated that they didn't really want to show Gus fumbling around in the early stages of his operation, so this will likely be Gus just as we know him from BB. We'll see!

And, unlike Mike and Saul, Gus' origin story was fairly well established in BB, so that ground has kinda been covered. There were hints that he was a part of the Pinochet regime in Chile, but that backstory seems tangential to BCS. Gus' quest for vengeance against Hector (which we've already seen the beginning and end of) is much more relevant.
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Shane Matlock
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Posted: 14 April 2017 at 3:33pm | IP Logged | 13  

Really looking forward to another season of this show. It's been really excellent so far. Definitely lives up to the legacy of greatness of the show it was spun off of.
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John Harrison
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Posted: 14 April 2017 at 6:48pm | IP Logged | 14  

I'm looking forward to Kirkman's weekly recaps of BCS. 

 The show itself is a masterpiece of pacing.  I'm starting to wonder if we are going to see Saul in the present struggle with leaving his criminal version of witness relocation as has happened in the real witness protection service. Henry Hill was loosely responsible for giving Nora Ephrin the idea or ideas for My Blue Heaven and was directly was for Goodfellas.  Saul seems to be cracking under the solitude of normalcy.  
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Rob Ocelot
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Posted: 15 April 2017 at 8:01am | IP Logged | 15  

Although, on TALKING SAUL, Gilligan did cryptically mention an upcoming episode which feels to him like "episode 63 of BREAKING BAD", so we'll see. That could mean any number of things.

One thing made very clear in BCS is that Jimmy cannot tolerate a 9 to 5 do-as-you're-told type of drone job without injecting a little of his 'true self' in there to fuck it all up.  As Gene, it's a hell of his own making that he has to lay low, shut up, wear a uniform, and always be looking over his shoulder.  You just know he's fighting his own instincts and sooner or later the cycle will start all over again.  An entire episode depicting this drudgery with a real "Saul" moment at the end wouldn't be out of the question, perhaps with a chance BB character cameo as a Cinnabon customer to get the ball rolling.

As an aside, I think we may also be in for some 'flash middles' at some point: scenes set during BB but with BCS characters to show that everyone didn't just leave ABQ or get murdered.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 15 April 2017 at 9:32am | IP Logged | 16  

I was talking with a friend of mine the other day about that lingering possibility of a Walter White cameo. Personally, I don't think it's necessary, and my friend is worried that it would somehow ruin things.

I see pretty much only two ways to do it: Jimmy/Saul goes to get a car wash (perhaps after he finally gets his Cadillac) at A1A, and Walt wipes down the car, or is seen manning the cash register. But, this assumes that Walt had the second job at the car wash a few years before the BREAKING BAD pilot, which seems a bit unlikely.

The other would be a new, between-scenes moment/storyline set during BREAKING BAD proper.

As it is, I think they've done a great job of avoiding gratuitous BB cameos. All of the cameos thus far have been very organic. They'd even hoped to have Marie Schrader performing the CT scan on Chuck in the hospital, last season--which would make sense--, but decided against it. Bringing in Walt or Jesse Pinkman just for the sake of a cameo or fanservice is not how Gilligan, Gould, and the writing staff operate. There were long stretches of BB where Walt and Jesse didn't even interact, despite the writing staff's love for butting those two against each other. This is because the writing needed to be organic and honest. As they describe it, they took the story where it naturally needed to go, even if it meant less fun in terms of Walt and Jesse interactions.

This same philosophy is now being applied to BCS. Take the story where it "tells" them to go in an organic way, and be honest with the storytelling. This is a style of writing which has served both shows incredibly well, and will surely continue to do so.

As for the adventures of Gene, the impression so far is that we're just gonna get these little beginning-of-season glimpses of where he's ended up. But, I think there's no way that we don't get some kind of deeper exploration of Jimmy at that point in his life. There have been hints that Omaha may not be the end of his story, and, as you note, Rob, it has been made clear again and again that he just can't operate queitly without his true self breaking through. Whether we get a mini-storyline in the form of these season-opening teasers, or a full episode set in Omaha (perhaps even the series finale), I think it's a safe bet that this is gonna go somewhere. It would be a missed opportunity if they didn't do something substantial with it, especially since it thematically ties in so well with the 2002-era material which makes up the bulk of the show. 


Edited by Greg Kirkman on 15 April 2017 at 9:34am
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Steve De Young
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Posted: 15 April 2017 at 12:10pm | IP Logged | 17  

I was talking with a friend of mine the other day about that lingering possibility of a Walter White cameo.
--------------------------------------------
Or, the final regular (color) timeline scene of the series is Saul and Walter meeting for the first time, reshot from Saul's angle.
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Rob Ocelot
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Posted: 15 April 2017 at 4:48pm | IP Logged | 18  

One other aspect I find interesting with BB and to a similar extent BCS play with the passage of time.  Most series just note the passage of a full year when the season starts just so they can keep their characters aging along with the actors.   

<BB Spoiler> It's revealed at one point the entire events of BB have not unfolded in real time as the seasons went by -- the gaps between seasons that happened in the real world did not happen so BB's finale happens in around 2009 or 2010 at the latest.   

We aren't told how much time has elspsed between when we last saw Saul and the B&W scenes in BCS.  I like to think 'Gene' is still living in an Obama led America, it makes me feel not so bad for his situation knowing that things might get a lot worse. :-)

Similarly, I think BCS is going to play fast and loose with any reference to the passage of time.  2002-ish but we might not make it to 2003 or 2004 in the show, so nowhere near where he would be interacting with Walter at the car wash.


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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 15 April 2017 at 10:31pm | IP Logged | 19  

Or, the final regular (color) timeline scene of the series is Saul and Walter meeting for the first time, reshot from Saul's angle.
+++++++

I'd considered mentioning that possibility, but it seems a bit too on-the-nose. Guess we'll see!
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 15 April 2017 at 10:44pm | IP Logged | 20  

One other aspect I find interesting with BB and to a similar extent BCS play with the passage of time.  Most series just note the passage of a full year when the season starts just so they can keep their characters aging along with the actors.   

<BB Spoiler> It's revealed at one point the entire events of BB have not unfolded in real time as the seasons went by -- the gaps between seasons that happened in the real world did not happen so BB's finale happens in around 2009 or 2010 at the latest.  
++++++++

Exactly. The events of BREAKING BAD span exactly two years--from Walt's 50th birthday to his 52nd birthday, from 2008-2010 or so. We don't really know--yet--when exactly Gene's adventures in Omaha are occurring. Not long after BREAKING BAD? Present day? How long has he been toiling away at that mall?

As Gilligan and crew have noted in the audio commentaries and such, BCS is essentially a period piece that takes place mostly in 2002, which requires them to use period-accurate computers, cars, etc. That means a full six or so years in-between series, so the likelihood of Saul running into Walt seems minimal.

As an aside, it should also be noted that very subtle de-aging CGI has been used on Odenkirk and McKean for their flashback scenes (such as the dinner with Chuck, Rebecca, and Jimmy in "Rebecca").

As another aside, I've been wondering more and more how things would play if BB and BCS were both taken apart and then mashed together in chronological order. Beginning with the earliest flashback (Jimmy working in his dad's store in 1973), moving on to Gus' fateful meeting with Don Eladio in the late 1980s, then to Walt and the pregnant Skyler buying their house in 1992 or so (around the same time as the afforementioned McGill family dinner), then moving into BCS proper and BB proper, and finally ending with however Gene's story in Omaha ends. Hmmm.


Edited by Greg Kirkman on 16 April 2017 at 9:44am
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Brandon Scott Berthelot
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Posted: 16 April 2017 at 5:50am | IP Logged | 21  

Watching Season 2 this weekend. On episode 8. Hulk
reference.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 17 April 2017 at 9:58pm | IP Logged | 22  

"Witness".


Wow, what a fantastic episode! We've really hit the ground running, despite that ever-deliberate pace and the long stretches without dialogue. There's definitely a tonal shift in evidence, now. No more fun with senior citizens (...well, there's still a little!), or Jimmy's wacky adventures at HHM and Davis & Main. The two consistent threads of this season have been Chuck's revenge scheme, and Mike getting drawn into Gus Fring's web.

This episode gets into full-on BREAKING BAD prequel territory, yet without feeling forced. And, despite our already knowing the ultimate outcome of all these events, the buildup still feels very tense and ominous.

And, hey--Francesca! Victor! Los Pollos Hermanos! Gus! The origin of Saul's "Gimme a dollar! I'm your lawyer, now!" trick from his very first appearance!

There's even a subtle continuity fix regarding BREAKING BAD. Back on BB, Saul mentioned that Francesca had previously worked at the DMV, but the creators later acknowledged that it's the "MVD" in New Mexico, hence the conversation in this episode.

Despite us all seeing it coming at least a year in advance, the reveal of the Los Pollos Hermanos restaurant (lovingly recreated in exact detail from its days on BB) is played for the proper tension. As I recently noted, this all still has to work as if BCS exists in its own world, so as to make sense for viewers who haven't seen BB. Thus, it seems appropriate that our reintroduction to Gus Fring is in exactly the same way we were introduced to him on BB--as the overly-friendly and helpful restaurant manager.

And, of course, Jimmy's explosion against Chuck at the end was a well-deserved payoff to a long buildup (...and we've never before seen this level of seriousness and gravitas from Odenkirk/Jimmy. It's rather shocking to watch, and a wonderful performance.). It's seems we're quickly getting into the driving question of this series: "What problem does Jimmy McGill have that becoming Saul Goodman solves?" 

And, regarding Jimmy's fate in Omaha, I suppose that the other driving question of BCS would be, "How does Gene solve the problem that his ceasing to be Saul Goodman created?"

As with BREAKING BAD, this show just gets better and better, with the slow and careful buildup leading to extremely satisfying payoffs. Some have wondered if bringing Gus in might cause BCS to become an overly-referential BREAKING BAD prequel to the exclusion of all else. Me, I say that 1) By the show's very nature, it kinda has to tie directly in with BB; 2) This kinda thinking proves that people have become really invested in the story of Jimmy McGill, as distinctly separate from his transformation into Saul Goodman. I'd call that a measure of the show's success in building up its story and characters. I find myself increasingly worried for Kim Wexler and the other characters living in Jimmy's orbit.

Heck, as much fun as it was to go full BREAKING BAD in this episode, I do find myself also kinda missing the purely-Jimmy McGill stuff of the first two seasons. As Gilligan and Gould have noted, this is feeling more and more like a genuine tragedy, rather than the story of a clownish, "criminal" lawyer. Quite an accomplishment, that.

Love this show so much!
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Steve De Young
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Posted: 18 April 2017 at 10:39am | IP Logged | 23  

I have no knowledge, so this is purely speculation, but I can see this season ending with the filing of a legal name change to escape the bad press of what appears to be a forthcoming arrest, and to disassociate from Chuck after his destruction of the family.

Also, was this the first revelation of what happened with Chuck's wife?  I had thought that maybe she had died, triggering Chuck's mental health issues, but Jimmy dropped the bomb this episode that she got fed up and left him.

Its also interesting that we're seeing Chuck revealed as just as much of a schemer as Jimmy, in his own way, just one who thinks he's a better sort of person.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 18 April 2017 at 11:11am | IP Logged | 24  

Yeah, they tossed off the reveal that Rebecca left Chuck, and not that she died, or anything like that. Definitely more to be explored, there. Heck, the whole question of Chuck's mental health has been dangling for three seasons, now. The whole "allergic to electricity" thing has been debunked by the medical community, so the questions of the how, when, and why of his "illness" are still floating around.

And, as Gilligan and Gould have noted in recent interviews, Chuck stooped to a "heartstrings" con, whereas Jimmy has always stuck with more morally-acceptable "greed" cons. Jimmy doesn't stoop to manipulating people on a deep emotional level, or tricking them into feeling empathy for him. He plays on their greed.

So, when he's betrayed by Chuck in such a personal way, it's no wonder he goes nuts. Chuck crossed the line that Jimmy never has.
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Michael Arndt
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Posted: 18 April 2017 at 1:39pm | IP Logged | 25  

Steve, I was thinking the same thing about Jimmy's upcoming name change. I also thought that he might have been forced to quit practicing the law under Jimmy McGill and there is where Saul arises.

Nice to see Victor and Francesca again. I would like to see more Hamlin. At first I didn't really care for the character but he has grown on me.


Two great episodes so far. Next week looks just as good.

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