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Topic: Did Anyone Pick Up Marvel Comics’ Star Wars #1 At The Time? Post ReplyPost New Topic
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John Byrne
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Posted: 10 November 2016 at 12:04pm | IP Logged | 1 post reply

Hey, Greg! Double-Oh Seven. En See See - One Seven Oh One. Twenty Oh One.
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Neil Lindholm
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Posted: 10 November 2016 at 4:01pm | IP Logged | 2 post reply

My first issue was #4, which my sister and I read until it fell apart (Mom had bought it for us. The first comic I remember owning). I class Star Wars #28 as the start of my comic book collecting phase. I still have it, as well as a complete run of Marvel Star Wars, which took me until 1998 to complete. I still remember the comic shop owner giving it to me after seeing me gush over finding the last issue I needed in his shop.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 11 November 2016 at 12:02am | IP Logged | 3 post reply

Hey, Greg! Double-Oh Seven. En See See - One Seven Oh One. Twenty Oh One.
++++++++

Yeah, yeah--just because it's a common thing doesn't make it correct! 


And, before anyone asks, I freely admit that I also do this number-to-letter swapping myself in daily life, if only to blend in and not seem like a grammar Nazi.


All I know is that vintage sources and licensing materials (press book, novelization insert, action figure backer card, etc.) clearly and consistently spell Threepio's name with "O" instead of "0", which indicates that, at some early point, someone must've asked which spelling was correct, so as to maintain consistency for publicity and licensing. And, it's clearly "O" in the script reproductions that I have (THE ART OF STAR WARS and STAR WARS: THE ANNOTATED SCREENPLAYS), which I presume were faithfully transcribed from the original shooting scripts.





....shouldn't that be "En See See Dash One Seven Oh One? After all, "-" could also be read as "Minus"...
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John Byrne
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Posted: 11 November 2016 at 9:26am | IP Logged | 4 post reply

When I was a kid I lived briefly in a surburban "planned community" called Sherwood Park. It was just outside Edmonton, in Canada. At the time I lived there the community was so small we only needed to dial the last four digits of anyone's phone number within Sherwood Park.

People dialing into Sherwood Park, tho, had to dial the exchange, too, and that was Oxford 9, so my parent's number, for instance, began with OX9. This caused all kinds of consternation, as most people calling Sherwood Park would instinctively dial 0 (zero) instead of O (oh). So they'd get the operator.

I suppose the demise of named exchanges fixed that problem.

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John Byrne
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Posted: 11 November 2016 at 9:27am | IP Logged | 5 post reply

And, before anyone asks, I freely admit that I also do this number-to-letter swapping myself in daily life, if only to blend in and not seem like a grammar Nazi.

Nothing to do with grammar, really. Just what we learn. My grandfather pronounced "0" as "nought." He was not grammatically incorrect in doing so.*

+++

....shouldn't that be "En See See Dash One Seven Oh One? After all, "-" could also be read as "Minus"...

S0D 0FF.

________________

* Technically, he pronounced it "nowt," common for the area where I grew up. When I had a British soldier use "nowt" in ANGEL - BLOOD AND TRENCHES, the proofreader "corrected" it to "now," even tho the use of that word made no sense at all in context.

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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 11 November 2016 at 10:59am | IP Logged | 6 post reply

Nothing to do with grammar, really. Just what we learn. My grandfather pronounced "0" as "nought." He was not grammatically incorrect in doing so.*

++++++++


Oh, Lordy--I'd forgotten about the Brits and "nought"! Let's not drag a third option into this! I now find myself wondering if anyone has ever read the name as "See-Threepinought"!


It occurs to me that, since Threepinought is programmed for etiquette and protocol, and speaks over six million languages, the simplest solution would be to ask him. You'd probably get a typically long-winded and huffy answer...


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Bill Collins
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Posted: 11 November 2016 at 11:54am | IP Logged | 7 post reply

Greg,don`t forget us Brits and `Zed` 

Edited by Bill Collins on 11 November 2016 at 11:54am
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 11 November 2016 at 12:08pm | IP Logged | 8 post reply

"See-Threepized" sounds like a STAR WARS/POLICE ACADEMY mash-up character!
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John Byrne
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Posted: 11 November 2016 at 12:44pm | IP Logged | 9 post reply

After I left England a TV series started called Z CARS. It was a cop show, and an adaptation ran in EAGLE.* It had been long enough since I'd crossed the Pond that I read the title as ZEE CARS.

Mind you, "zed" perplexed me as a child learning the alphabet in England. Why "zed"? I would ask. After all, it wasn't bed sed and ded after A. The American version made SO much more sense to me. As did dropping those superfluos Us.

----------------

* It might have been an ad for hot chocolate or something.

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Michael Penn
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Posted: 11 November 2016 at 1:00pm | IP Logged | 10 post reply

Thou whoreson zed, thou unnecessary letter! -- King Lear 
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James Woodcock
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Posted: 11 November 2016 at 1:03pm | IP Logged | 11 post reply

Shocked expression! Traitor!
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 11 November 2016 at 10:48pm | IP Logged | 12 post reply

...I've found myself imagining how things would have been if Bobcat Goldthwait had been cast as Threepio (or at least dubbed the voice), today. 
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Brian Hague
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Posted: 11 November 2016 at 11:37pm | IP Logged | 13 post reply

Wasn't Threepio supposed to originally be a fast-talking, used-car-salesman type? I've tried imagining Danny Devito in the role, but without much success.

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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 16 November 2016 at 6:58am | IP Logged | 14 post reply

Thread drift, I know, but some US terminology makes sense, other terminology does not.

I can understand why you say "sweater" rather than "jumper". A jumper? Do we jump when we wear them?

But when I fill up my car, I'm putting "petrol" in there. Why do you guys say "gas"? Okay, I get it (gasoline), but "filling your car up with gas" doesn't make sense to me. ;-)

And as for your dates, well 25/12/15 is easier on my eyes than 12/25/16. ;)
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James Woodcock
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Posted: 16 November 2016 at 4:50pm | IP Logged | 15 post reply

To continue the thread drift. I do a lot of travelling and I've noticed a lot of American words have now krept in to my vocabulary as the people I work with tend to use those words. It was actually JB that made me realise this when he questioned why I, a Brit, was using the term 'truck' 

I realised that I had strted to use it when I travelled to Brazil and China. Now, I hardly ever use lorry, but tend to use truck. There are other examples too.

But I will never use the American date notation. Day/month/year makes sense as you are progressing up. Month/day/year just makes no sense to me at all. And I blame comics for making me figure that all out at a very young age as I would try to figure out whether comics were annual or monthly based on the date of the next issue published in the back. Specific issue was something like Defenders 24.


Edited by James Woodcock on 16 November 2016 at 4:51pm
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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 16 November 2016 at 7:33pm | IP Logged | 16 post reply

I used truck a lot, too, but I think that was due to the influence of US TV shows. 90% of the stuff I watched as a kid was from the US.

Had I been the son of lorry driver or something, or worked in an industry which used lorries, I may well have used that term. Sometimes it's hard to escape the influence of terminology from TV. ;-) 
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Marc Cheek
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Posted: 18 November 2016 at 7:11pm | IP Logged | 17 post reply

I didn't buy it new. It wasn't until
after the movie came out that I bought the
bundled reprints. I never did buy the
title regularly though.
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Steven Myers
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Posted: 25 November 2016 at 5:18pm | IP Logged | 18 post reply

The first I bought was issues 7-9 in a bag together.

Years later finally got a copy of #10 to see how that all worked out!
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Brian Miller
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Posted: 25 November 2016 at 8:50pm | IP Logged | 19 post reply

I just bought it about 2 years ago. Got it dirt cheap. Two or three bucks as I recall. 

The first issues I got as a kid were 16-18 in some sort of bagged set. Walt/Wiacek did the art on one of them. 
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Emery Calame
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Posted: 26 November 2016 at 4:20am | IP Logged | 20 post reply

I remember a friend from the UK asking me over skype if I had ever watched "Hawaii 5 nought" when it was on the air, and I had to let him in on Five-0 referring to Hawaii being the 50th state though somehow over the years it became informal slang for a police officer because of that show. I'm still not clear if he said five nought to grind my gears or he thought that was how it was pronounced. "Book 'em Dan-nought."

Also I remember bubblegum cards being extra-frustrating when I was a kid because someone always took the gum out and replaced it with a pink disposable box cutter.


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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 26 November 2016 at 1:34pm | IP Logged | 21 post reply

I'm still not clear if he said five nought to grind my gears or he thought that was how it was pronounced.

***

Hmmm, methinks he was pulling your leg.

Everyone, myself included, said Five-0 when mentioning that show. As did my mum and stepdad. Never heard anyone say Five-Nought. Besides, Five-Nought does not roll off the tongue naturally.
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Emery Calame
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Posted: 29 November 2016 at 7:55pm | IP Logged | 22 post reply

I'm just going to say it sounded a wee bit "showcased" and I've certainly been baited before.
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Tim O'Neill
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Posted: 29 November 2016 at 8:00pm | IP Logged | 23 post reply



I disliked the original STAR WARS adaptation as a kid. The art didn't look like the movie, I didn't like that it was in multiple issues - there was nothing about it that worked for me. I tried reading the stories after the adaptation, and they didn't work for me either.

I did love THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK adaptation - the art was amazing on that one!


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Petter Myhr Ness
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Posted: 20 December 2016 at 5:39am | IP Logged | 24 post reply

I still have original adaptations of all the 3 movies as they were released over here. The first one is interesting for many reasons; it features a Jabba unlike anything we've seen, it is made abundantly clear that Han shoots first * and Vader is referred to as a Sith lord - something that was omitted from the movie.

--
* In the revised adapation by Bruce Jones and Eduard Barretto, this has of course changed.
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James Woodcock
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Posted: 20 December 2016 at 5:47am | IP Logged | 25 post reply

Han did not 'shoot first'. Han shot. Greedo died without getting a shot off.

There is a difference
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