Active Topics | Member List | Search | Help | Register | Login
The John Byrne Forum
Byrne Robotics > The John Byrne Forum Page of 5 Next >>
Topic: FINDERS Comments Post ReplyPost New Topic
Author
Message
John Byrne
Avatar
Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 113163
Posted: 18 December 2014 at 1:46pm | IP Logged | 1 post reply

It occurs to me that three weeks is maybe too long to keep you all seething and churning with your comments on the FINDERS OF LOST CHILDREN thread. So you can make them here. I'll still keep the "story thread" locked.

As usual, NO SPECULATION PLEASE!!

Back to Top profile | search
 
Gundars Berzins
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 14 March 2012
Location: United States
Posts: 1152
Posted: 18 December 2014 at 2:02pm | IP Logged | 2 post reply

Thanks for posting Finders, it's been too long without a new JB book fix. I'm actually liking this format of viewing this work. Something very different. Also this story is very intriguing along with your artwork, wow.
Back to Top profile | search | www e-mail
 
Matthew Wilkie
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 09 March 2011
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 1061
Posted: 18 December 2014 at 2:03pm | IP Logged | 3 post reply

Loving this, JB. Finally, a new story in the JBNM universe. Can't wait to see how it unfolds. Thanks for posting it!

Any other hidden gems?!
Back to Top profile | search
 
Philippe Negrin
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 01 August 2007
Location: France
Posts: 2217
Posted: 18 December 2014 at 3:12pm | IP Logged | 4 post reply

Two words. Thank you. Nah some more words : It's great to see the story unfold one page a day. Another reason this forum is my favourite internet place ! 
Back to Top profile | search
 
Philippe Negrin
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 01 August 2007
Location: France
Posts: 2217
Posted: 18 December 2014 at 3:14pm | IP Logged | 5 post reply

Needless to say, I'm printing and lettering every page for my own personal reading pleasure. I promise I'll never post it anywhere...
Back to Top profile | search
 
Brennan Voboril
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 15 January 2011
Posts: 1380
Posted: 18 December 2014 at 3:24pm | IP Logged | 6 post reply

Thanks for posting these JB.  I am really enjoying seeing, and reading, it.  
Back to Top profile | search
 
Marc Cheek
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 18 June 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 1785
Posted: 18 December 2014 at 3:42pm | IP Logged | 7 post reply

Thanks for posting JB! I'm looking forward to seeing the remainder.
Back to Top profile | search e-mail
 
Josh Goldberg
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 25 October 2005
Location: United States
Posts: 2017
Posted: 18 December 2014 at 4:33pm | IP Logged | 8 post reply

Thanks for the freebie, JB.  It only represents a few dollars to each of us, but much more to you.  I still hold out hopes for your return to traditional hand-drawn comics and the Byrnverse of characters.
Back to Top profile | search
 
David Bensette
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 05 October 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 351
Posted: 18 December 2014 at 4:40pm | IP Logged | 9 post reply

LOVE the Mustang!
One of my first cars!
Back to Top profile | search e-mail
 
Josh Goldberg
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 25 October 2005
Location: United States
Posts: 2017
Posted: 18 December 2014 at 4:44pm | IP Logged | 10 post reply

Qs4JB:
Reading the script, I assume that the dialogue in ALL CAPS is meant to be printed in bold type.
As a writer, how do you decide which words merit that emphasis?
Is it always the writer's call, or does the letterer sometimes make that call?
Is there an industry standard, or does it vary from writer to writer?
Back to Top profile | search
 
Michael Arndt
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 26 April 2004
Posts: 8368
Posted: 18 December 2014 at 5:05pm | IP Logged | 11 post reply

Love the title of the issue.
Back to Top profile | search e-mail
 
Peter Martin
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 17 March 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 11125
Posted: 18 December 2014 at 6:50pm | IP Logged | 12 post reply

Enjoying it so far, the art is high quality and the story has me intrigued. It's also very nice to be spoon-fed the regular updates -- something to look forward to each day.

Thanks for uploading it, JB -- a gratefully-received Christmas gift!
Back to Top profile | search
 
Brad Hague
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 19 December 2006
Location: United States
Posts: 1632
Posted: 18 December 2014 at 7:15pm | IP Logged | 13 post reply

Love the art.  
You retain your talent for creating characters with obvious personality with a few swift strokes of dialogue.  
You also remain a master of keeping a reader's attention being intriguing without being obvious about what is going to happen.
Love it.
Please don't cut off your ear.
Back to Top profile | search
 
Wallace Sellars
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 01 May 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 15810
Posted: 18 December 2014 at 8:08pm | IP Logged | 14 post reply

Thanks, JB! I dig your superhero comics, but love seeing you draw
"normal" people wearing "regular" clothes in "real world" settings!
Back to Top profile | search | www
 
Paul Reis
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 16 April 2004
Location: Canada
Posts: 860
Posted: 18 December 2014 at 9:21pm | IP Logged | 15 post reply

WOW! and holy crap!

Qs4JB:
Do you end up changing the dialogue? I was totally flabbergasted at the amount of dialogue, and where you were going to put it. 1st case in point: Page Two, Panels 2, 3 and 4 - where is the room for all those word balloons? and many other places as well. 
but i do like the idea of art on the left and text on the right (yes, i'm reformatting this as you post each page). it almost has a "Prince Valiant" vibe to it. 
oh, and story-wise:i am enjoying it so far.

thanks for this, JB.

Edited to add: I, too, am reformatting for my own reading pleasure - no intention to post anywhere outside of my little Chromebook and for my eyes only.


Edited by Paul Reis on 18 December 2014 at 9:26pm
Back to Top profile | search
 
John Byrne
Avatar
Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 113163
Posted: 19 December 2014 at 6:45am | IP Logged | 16 post reply

Reading the script, I assume that the dialogue in ALL CAPS is meant to be printed in bold type.

• Correct. Like italics in a text page.

As a writer, how do you decide which words merit that emphasis?

• Mostly by ear.

Is it always the writer's call, or does the letterer sometimes make that call?

• The writer.

Is there an industry standard, or does it vary from writer to writer?

• Personal "style."

Back to Top profile | search
 
John Byrne
Avatar
Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 113163
Posted: 19 December 2014 at 6:46am | IP Logged | 17 post reply

Do you end up changing the dialogue? I was totally flabbergasted at the amount of dialogue, and where you were going to put it. 1st case in point: Page Two, Panels 2, 3 and 4 - where is the room for all those word balloons? and many other places as well.

••

After forty yar before the mast, I have a pretty good eye for how much space dialog will need.

Back to Top profile | search
 
John Byrne
Avatar
Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 113163
Posted: 19 December 2014 at 6:49am | IP Logged | 18 post reply

Love the title of the issue.

••

Now, there's something I DID change. Originally, I thought of a pseudo-James Bond title, "The Girl with the Golden Gaze." But then I got to thinking a bit more about the time period of my story.

Back to Top profile | search
 
J W Campbell
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 28 June 2012
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 353
Posted: 19 December 2014 at 7:05am | IP Logged | 19 post reply

 John Byrne wrote:
As a writer, how do you decide which words merit that emphasis?

• Mostly by ear.

Is it always the writer's call, or does the letterer sometimes make that call?

• The writer.

In this era of full script, where the writer will often not get to see the art in order to check that the character is correctly 'acting' as the dialogue requires before it goes for lettering, at least half the scripts I get have very little indication as to where the emphasis should go, and it's left to the letterer (me) to make those judgements.

Obviously, the if the writer has put emphasis into the dialogue, then this is observed, but there are many writers nowadays who don't.




Edited by J W Campbell on 19 December 2014 at 7:05am
Back to Top profile | search | www
 
John Byrne
Avatar
Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 113163
Posted: 19 December 2014 at 7:16am | IP Logged | 20 post reply

In this era of full script, where the writer will often not get to see the art in order to check that the character is correctly 'acting' as the dialogue requires before it goes for lettering, at least half the scripts I get have very little indication as to where the emphasis should go, and it's left to the letterer (me) to make those judgements.

Obviously, the if the writer has put emphasis into the dialogue, then this is observed, but there are many writers nowadays who don't.

••

One more thing the current crew thinks they're doing right, I guess, ignoring almost a hundred years of logic and tradition. I can't imagine leaving something so important to the discretion of the letterer!

Your comment about the "acting" puzzles me, tho. In this age of full script, have they also abandoned descriptions of what's supposed to be happening in the panel? Or is this a lapse back to the kind of stuff Denny O'Neil used to describe, where a writer's description of an action packed stagecoach chase is rendered by the artist as closeup on a firing six-gun?

Back to Top profile | search
 
J W Campbell
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 28 June 2012
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 353
Posted: 19 December 2014 at 7:44am | IP Logged | 21 post reply

 John Byrne wrote:
Your comment about the "acting" puzzles me, tho. In this age of full script, have they also abandoned descriptions of what's supposed to be happening in the panel?

No, I mean that there's still a lot of leeway in full script, and the writer may imagine a character as being apoplectic with fury when he writes the script and the line, but the art may show the character more coldly furious, making shouty dialogue seem incongruous.

Now, in my book, that right there is what an editor's for: to either send the art back to the artist and say "draw what's in the script, bub!" or to take the decision to sub the script so it fits the art, but the role of editor is frequently reduced to that of traffic management, much to the medium's detriment, IMO.

EDIT: But I'm dragging this off-topic. My apologies. Having clarified, I shall say no more.


Edited by J W Campbell on 19 December 2014 at 7:45am
Back to Top profile | search | www
 
Conrad Teves
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 28 January 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 1550
Posted: 19 December 2014 at 8:07am | IP Logged | 22 post reply

Great mood with all the vintage stuff, the cars and computers--gorgeous!
Back to Top profile | search | www e-mail
 
Richard Stevens
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 04 May 2004
Location: United States
Posts: 1305
Posted: 19 December 2014 at 8:53am | IP Logged | 23 post reply

I love this. I love the JBNM world and any chance to visit in any format is welcome! I'm really taken by how easy it is to "read" the story silently, then read the dialogue to get another layer. So much of the story is in the art and that's why I am a JB fan.
Back to Top profile | search | www
 
John Byrne
Avatar
Imaginary X-Man

Joined: 11 May 2005
Posts: 113163
Posted: 19 December 2014 at 10:06am | IP Logged | 24 post reply

Great mood with all the vintage stuff, the cars and computers--gorgeous!

••

One of the fun elements of doing series like this, set in the Past, is coming up with the appropriate "futuristic" equipment. Computers, for example, as we imagined they would be, not as they really turned out to be.

Back to Top profile | search
 
Peter Martin
Byrne Robotics Member
Avatar

Joined: 17 March 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 11125
Posted: 19 December 2014 at 10:22am | IP Logged | 25 post reply

Loving the impact of the red on the latest page, also the contrast of the blasι, seen-it-all-before look on the photographer's face and Cynthia's look of shock.

Speaking of vintage stuff, I like the camera here.
Back to Top profile | search
 

Page of 5 Next >>
  Post ReplyPost New Topic
Printable version Printable version

Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot create polls in this forum
You can vote in polls in this forum

 Active Topics | Member List | Search | Help | Register | Login