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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 09 February 2018 at 12:39pm | IP Logged | 1 post reply

I am a huge fan of DIZZY.

EVERYONE'S A WALLY is another one.

You are quite right about 1-2 people making up the development team and stamping their personalities all over the games.

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Richard White
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Posted: 09 February 2018 at 3:23pm | IP Logged | 2 post reply

That looks very good Robbie, will be checking it out.

Dizzy was probably the first video game franchise(not that I would have used that term back then)I fell in love with. My particular favourite was Treasure Island Dizzy. My dreams are still haunted by dropping the damn snorkel whilst underwater.
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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 09 February 2018 at 5:41pm | IP Logged | 3 post reply

Yes, that damn snorkel.

The original DIZZY is one of my favourite games. And the theme was so memorable. It was so fun trying to figure out what items were for, e.g. leprechaun's wig. :)
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Richard White
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Posted: 11 February 2018 at 7:34am | IP Logged | 4 post reply

It's great to see that Codemasters, who don't seem to have any desire to do anything with it, are completely cool with fan games being produced.


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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 11 February 2018 at 8:20am | IP Logged | 5 post reply

Ah, Codemasters. Remember Ocean, too? Loved seeing those logos on games, it usually indicated quality to my naive brain.

I mean, Ocean did this great little game:


You had to retrieve boots, utility belt and other stuff before you could even think about setting off to rescue Robin.

Richard, go to 12:19 of the video in that link. Crazy game! 


Edited by Robbie Parry on 11 February 2018 at 8:21am
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Richard White
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Posted: 12 February 2018 at 2:01pm | IP Logged | 6 post reply

Ocean were a huge player up to the 16 bit era. They were one of the first software companies to realise the potential of licensed games. They scored big with RoboCop and Batman the Movie especially. Sadly they were absorbed by Infogrames, who dumped the Ocean brand and rebranded as Atari before all but going bankrupt.

As for that Batman game, It's utterly brilliant just like John Ritman's other isometric classic, Head Over Heals.
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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 12 February 2018 at 2:02pm | IP Logged | 7 post reply

Ah, so that's what happened to Ocean? I always wondered. I can still remember the RoboCop and Batman themes.

Elite Systems was another brand I was very aware of.
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Richard White
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Posted: 13 February 2018 at 5:28am | IP Logged | 8 post reply

Elite are actually still going!

I'm trying to think who's still around from the 8/16 bit era. There is Code Masters, Rare (who were Ultimate Play the Game), Team 17.

Psygnosis were a studio/publisher I loved, they often had amazing box art from Roger Dean. They became famous for the Wipeout series, being rebranded as Sony Liverpool and sadly shut down a few years ago.

Then there was DMA Design, famous for the Lemmings games. They would go on create a little known series called Grand Theft Auto.


Edited by Richard White on 13 February 2018 at 5:29am
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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 13 February 2018 at 6:53am | IP Logged | 9 post reply

Thanks for all the info.

I used to love the sports games that Codemasters released:





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Richard White
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Posted: 14 February 2018 at 4:25am | IP Logged | 10 post reply

As a kid I really appreciated Code Masters budget prices. I ended up with a lot of the Simulator range!
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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 14 February 2018 at 9:04am | IP Logged | 11 post reply

I'll state one thing (even though it's an apple and oranges thing), I do love the simplicity and accessibility of classic games.

Some modern games are great - I love GTA V - but when you play them, you have to put a catheter in and shut yourself away for days. ;-) At least with older games, you could dip in and out for an hour or two.
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Richard White
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Posted: 15 February 2018 at 4:22am | IP Logged | 12 post reply

That's very true.

I really appreciate Nintendo's design on Breath of the Wild and Super Mario Odyssey, massive games with a huge amount of content but done in a way that you can dip in and out or have a marathon session but feeling like you're being rewarded whichever way you choose.
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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 15 February 2018 at 5:21am | IP Logged | 13 post reply

The marathon session can be off-putting to me.

Sure, I like it with GTA V or other things, but I just want to dip in at times. I don't want to have to devote weeks to progressing through a game.

It's not short-attention span, I promise. I do enjoy GTA V. And obviously, one can save games. But it's about commitment. Sometimes I may want to play "dip in and out" games, not commit to a game that, if I want to complete it, will take up a lot of my life.
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Richard White
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Posted: 15 February 2018 at 8:49am | IP Logged | 14 post reply

Odyssey's design is particularly brilliant. It can completed quite quickly and fairly easily but beyond that is a wealth of more content should you want it.

I like the way the game is designed that most skill levels can complete it but there is much more depth or challenge if you want it.
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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 21 February 2018 at 4:24am | IP Logged | 15 post reply

Picked up the February 1992 issue of AMIGA FORMAT via eBay. There's a news piece about the 3 millionth Amiga being sold. And the article stated this:


 QUOTE:
In America, the Amiga is seen primarily as a creative tool for video, multimedia and graphics work, and in Germany, which has around 700,000 Amiga owners, it's also taken very seriously. The vibrancy of the UK Amiga market is probably accounted for by the fact that it's seen primarily as a games machine over here.

I thought that was interesting. Cultural differences, eh?
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Richard White
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Posted: 23 February 2018 at 12:31pm | IP Logged | 16 post reply

On a gaming forum I frequent, when talking about retro games, if the Amiga pops up you can be almost certain it's a Brit!

A lot of folks on the same forum talk about the great video game crash of the mid 1980s, which was really only in the U.S., while we in the UK were entering a golden age of sorts.
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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 23 February 2018 at 2:10pm | IP Logged | 17 post reply

I didn't have an Amiga, but had access to someone else's. I did play a rugby game that was impossible to play. Very hard (or maybe I was just useless).

You don't hear about the Amiga as much as, say, the Sega Master System II or SNES whenever retro topics come up.
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Richard White
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Posted: 24 February 2018 at 8:05am | IP Logged | 18 post reply

I just looked up the worldwide sales figures Robbie and across all models the Amiga sold around 5 million units while the SNES was close to 50 million.

So there's a few more old SNES owners out there!
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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 24 February 2018 at 10:04am | IP Logged | 19 post reply

Cool stats, Richard. I'll have to look up stats for the Sega Master System II, a console I consider to be underrated.
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Richard White
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Posted: 24 February 2018 at 11:30am | IP Logged | 20 post reply

Master System was definitely bigger in the UK than the NES. I remember it getting games and an advertising push even after the Mega Drive and SNES were out.
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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 24 February 2018 at 12:36pm | IP Logged | 21 post reply

It was, although it didn't feel like it at times. In the publications I was reading, and during certain discussions, it seemed like the "poor cousin" of similar consoles. I find that sad because I enjoyed what it had to offer.
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Michael Roberts
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Posted: 24 February 2018 at 2:13pm | IP Logged | 22 post reply

I had never heard of the Sega Master System. Apparently it sold only 1 million units in Japan and less than 2 million in the US, compared to 6.8 million units in Europe. 
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Richard White
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Posted: 24 February 2018 at 3:39pm | IP Logged | 23 post reply

The Master System was very popular in Europe but nothing compared to Brasil, where it was still being manufactured under licence until recently.

It also had a bit more under the hood than the NES, but Nintendo's strict third party policies (which they were able to enforce due to controlling about 90% of the market at the time) meant SEGA had to almost singlehandedly provide the software support for it.

Ultimately though I think the NES had a much better library as you had Nintendo's own support along with many heavyweights like Capcom, Konami, Namco, Tecmo, Sunsoft, Enix, Square and the vast bulk of Japanese game developers.


Edited by Richard White on 25 February 2018 at 3:13am
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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 24 February 2018 at 6:09pm | IP Logged | 24 post reply

You're full of facts with regards to retro games, Richard (thanks!), I've definitely learnt a lot since we started this discussion. It's interesting that Brazil was still manufacturing it under licence until recently.
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Richard White
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Posted: 25 February 2018 at 9:30am | IP Logged | 25 post reply

That's courtesy of a misspent youth Robbie, that's lasted well into adulthood!

One surprise I had years after its heyday, was discovering that the Mega Drive was a complete flop in Japan. Growing up in the era where the Mega Drive/Genesis went toe to toe with the SNES (pretty sure SEGA were top again in the UK) in Europe and the US, it was odd to discover the machine was a distant third in its native country to the SNES and the PC Engine (Turbo Grafx in the US).
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