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Topic: What disc did you have in last (and what did you think)? Post ReplyPost New Topic
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John Harrison
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Joined: 27 July 2007
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Posted: 16 July 2020 at 4:05pm | IP Logged | 1 post reply

Unforgiven (2013) The Japanese remake of the original starring Ken Watanabe
in the main role. A very gripping and haunting version.
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John Byrne
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Posted: 16 July 2020 at 5:27pm | IP Logged | 2 post reply

THE BLUE MAX (1966)

Honestly, there IS more to this movie than Ursula Andress almost nekkid.

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Petter Myhr Ness
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Posted: 18 July 2020 at 2:55pm | IP Logged | 3 post reply

KNIVES OUT (2019)

Well, I'll be damned - a Rion Johnson movie that I actually liked! Very enjoyable, with plenty for fans of the crime genre. 
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Shaun Barry
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Posted: 19 July 2020 at 8:57am | IP Logged | 4 post reply


I LOVE YOU TO DEATH (1990)

An enjoyable minor comedy with a great ensemble cast, which did almost no business back in '90... it's been years since I last saw it (10 years?  20?  25?), but it holds up just fine.

Not perfect... the script is slight, and the cast is a little too good to have to resort to some slap-schtick every so often, but there are still some huge laughs to be had.  Kevin Kline and William Hurt are the two standouts for me, both in atypical roles... ironically enough, for how much his reputation has grown since his untimely death, I found River Phoenix to be the only weak link.

And Tracey Ullman and Joan Plowright are so perfect together as daughter & mother, that my own youngest daughter asked if they were the same actress, playing two different roles!!



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Brian Floyd
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Posted: 19 July 2020 at 6:30pm | IP Logged | 5 post reply

HAMILTON, on Disney+

I watch the actor who played George Washington on BULL, and the actor who played Thomas Jefferson and Marquis de Lafayette on SNOWPIERCER, so it was a treat seeing them do this. Definitely 4 stars. 

Aaron Burr really was a piece of trash.




Edited by Brian Floyd on 19 July 2020 at 6:31pm
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John Byrne
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Posted: 20 July 2020 at 5:18am | IP Logged | 6 post reply

Aaron Burr really was a piece of trash.

••

Yes, let's all get our history from biased musicals!!

TIME

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David Miller
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Joined: 16 April 2004
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Posted: 20 July 2020 at 4:13pm | IP Logged | 7 post reply

Lol, leave out some light treason and of course Burr looks more heroic. Maybe the author omitted the charges and trial because it wasn't mentioned in the musical?

I thought this Hamilton fact check ("It is great theater and bad history") better detailed and far less debatable.
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John Byrne
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Posted: 22 July 2020 at 6:05am | IP Logged | 8 post reply

YESTERDAY (2019)

This one got me thinking. Guy wakes up in a world in which the Beatles never existed, and builds himself a successful career out of presenting their songs as his own.

And I wondered... Would the Beatles’ music be so popular out of context? Would the songs have their iconic status if they were presented in a different world, at a different time?

The Beatles have been pretty much canonized, which means the details of their ascent have become faded and blurred. If they hadn't "infiltrated" society the way they did, at the time they did, where they did.....

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Michael Penn
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Posted: 22 July 2020 at 7:02am | IP Logged | 9 post reply

To their lasting credit, none of the Beatles ever
asserted that they were cultural leaders but rather
reflected what was already happening around them. Even at
the height of their popularity, they knew that they
themselves, as musicians, as artists, were mere ciphers
for a nearly crazed phenomenon in which they were
virtually irrelevant -- they would play to massive
audiences who could not hear a single note of their
music, nothing, and yet screamed like lunatics. And not
just the kids. As Lennon admitted later, their touring
was like something out of Fellini's Satyricon, and
everybody from the random fan to the Lord High Mayor was
in on it for the sheer (crazed!) fun.

Tangentially, it's definitely interesting to ponder, as
JB keeps generously giving us more ELSEWHEN stories,
whether the original impact (not the intrinsic quality!)
of the Dark Phoenix saga was also a matter mostly of
context, and particularly so because it seems like the
impact was really most powerful years after JB had
departed.
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John Byrne
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Posted: 22 July 2020 at 7:14am | IP Logged | 10 post reply

I'm going to borrow your second paragraph for the ELSEWHEN thread. . .
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Shaun Barry
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Posted: 22 July 2020 at 5:53pm | IP Logged | 11 post reply


70 years of:

Billy Wilder's SUNSET BOULEVARD (1950)

Feels like it gets more ironic, bitter, haunting and sad, with each passing decade.  A deserved '50s classic.



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Michael Penn
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Posted: 23 July 2020 at 6:18am | IP Logged | 12 post reply

IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT (1967): watched it with my 12 year
old son for the first time. I always smile (now) at Rod
Steiger's shock that Poitier's character earned, as a
Philadelphia homicide detective, $162.39 per week. That's
about $1250 per week today. It does put into perspective
the 12¢ cost of a comicbook back in 1967 -- and for me
personally that the $5 per week I earned in my first job as
a kid wasn't so bad.
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