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Topic: What disc did you have in last (and what did you think)? Post ReplyPost New Topic
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John Byrne
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Posted: 09 November 2019 at 6:25pm | IP Logged | 1 post reply

If this documentary was the only knowledge one had, one would think Chris was the only one that had a hand in stories or characters. Totally gives him complete credit for Days of Future Past. Totally gives him credit for Kitty. I don't want to downplay his contribution, but it doesn't need to be overplayed, either

•••

I’m sure Chris has taken every opportunity to correct this misapprehension.

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Peter Martin
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Posted: 09 November 2019 at 7:31pm | IP Logged | 2 post reply

What We Do In The Shadows (2014).

Brilliant! I had a kind of anxiety as the movie went along, that maybe the jokes would wear thin, but they maintained the quality perfectly throughout, cleverly introducing something new and inspired every so often to keep the laughs (and other emotions) coming. Loved it.
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Kevin Sharp
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Joined: 09 December 2007
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Posted: 10 November 2019 at 12:39pm | IP Logged | 3 post reply

ECHO IN THE VALLEY (2019)

***

I second Brian's praise of this documentary/concert film but for anyone looking it's called Echo In The CANYON. 
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Brian Miller
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Joined: 28 July 2004
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Posted: 10 November 2019 at 12:46pm | IP Logged | 4 post reply

Shit. I knew that. I will edit. 
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John Byrne
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Posted: 10 November 2019 at 7:44pm | IP Logged | 5 post reply

SLAUGHTERHOUSE-FIVE (1972)

Kurt Vonnegut reputedly called this a “flawless adaptation” of his novel. I hope he was being sincere, as I would have a hard time disagreeing.

(Just learned—or had forgotten—Valerie Perrine has Parkinson’s disease.)

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John Byrne
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Posted: 13 November 2019 at 12:34pm | IP Logged | 6 post reply

ZOMBIELAND (2009)

Dark, funny, occasionally brilliant.

But still not sure I want to see the sequel.

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Peter Martin
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Posted: 13 November 2019 at 1:25pm | IP Logged | 7 post reply

Faust (1926)

Visually very impressive, especially in the first third. As soon as I finished, I actually went back to the beginning to run through some of the striking imagery again. The huge devil with his black wings wrapped around the entire town; the devil doffing his cap wherever Faust goes, eyes burning in the dark like a cat's; old Faust trapped within a mirror. All memorably conceived and executed. I'd say the film becomes less interesting once it moves into the section with Gretchen, but overall I think this is a better film than Murnau's celebrated Nosferatu. Interesting to try and understand the German intertitles. The language used is generally pretty straightforward, though the fraktur font can be tricky and there's a few archaic words thrown in there.

Eerie note: the film finishes in a flourish and the piano score played a tune that I thought, "hmmm, I know that tune." It sounded kind of Wagnerian at first. Then I thought, no, that's something else, something I've been listening to recently. And I started thinking it was some kind of church music. Anyway, I went to my computer to look through my itunes, as I was sure it was something in my music library. And then it turned out, it was literally the last tune I had listened to on itunes before watching Faust. Complete, but weird, coincidence (it was a song by Beethoven called Die Ehre Gottes aus der Natur).


Edited by Peter Martin on 13 November 2019 at 1:26pm
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John Byrne
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Posted: 16 November 2019 at 8:45pm | IP Logged | 8 post reply

THE TERMINAL MAN (1973)

All the ticks and tropes of 70s movies in one film. Cold and distant, mannered, with no real access to any of the characters. Plus that faux Italian quality that infected so many American films around this time.

Doesn’t even have a real ending.

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Peter Martin
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Posted: 16 November 2019 at 9:03pm | IP Logged | 9 post reply

I recorded that from TCM and started watching it today. Was worried it might not be all that good; now I'm even more worried! I read the book a long time ago. Slightly bemused by the TCM intro saying Mike Hodges was known for his gritty, realistic style. It's true, but then there's Flash Gordon.

I finished watching Hamlet (1948) yesterday. Effective and accessible version. The first encounter with the ghost, particularly, is very effective. Basically shot like a horror movie. Great way to get things moving.

Long known that this is a celebrated film, naturally, but only after reading about it online after watching the film did I realise that it won Oscars for Best Picture and Best Actor. 
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John Byrne
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Posted: 17 November 2019 at 8:00am | IP Logged | 10 post reply

DOG DAY AFTERNOON (1975)

This was on TCM right after THE TERMINAL MAN, so, as it was one I also had not seen before, I decided to give it a look.

Another 70s Movie, but this time from the other end of the spectrum. Hollywood in the early Seventies was still climbing our of the Sitcom Valley, where everything was over-sharp, over-bright, over-colored, and this is an example of that escape. Gritty in a literal sense, and with a lot of dark humor.

Unfortunately, I made the mistake of googling the backstory and discovered the movie has very little to do with what actually happened. If I'd actually seen it in the Seventies, I probably would not mind that so much, but as most of you know I have become grumpier in my old age.*

______________________

* Remembering when I used to use "old age" metaphorically. . . . .

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Michael Penn
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Posted: 17 November 2019 at 9:58am | IP Logged | 11 post reply

I'm definitely surprised, JB, that you'd never seen DOG DAY AFTERNOON. But that movie, famous as it was, had been for me as a New Yorker a much closer-to-home story because of the original events. My first roommate in college grew up down the street from that Chase Manhattan, and he was one of the crowd who made that scene (as we used to say in the 70s). Despite some clear accuracy issues, can't deny that Al Pacino was perfectly cast. 


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Peter Martin
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Posted: 17 November 2019 at 2:37pm | IP Logged | 12 post reply

I've only seen Dog Day Afternoon once, but I thought it was a very good movie. The film before, Sidney Lumet made Murder on the Orient Express, the film after, Network. Not a bad run! 

Edited by Peter Martin on 17 November 2019 at 2:37pm
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