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Topic: What disc did you have in last (and what did you think)? Post ReplyPost New Topic
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John Byrne
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Joined: 11 May 2005
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Posted: 19 September 2018 at 2:21pm | IP Logged | 1 post reply

JURASSIC PARK: FALLEN KINGDOM (2018)

Too long, too contrived, too many trips to the well.

And one too many plot lines.

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Rebecca Jansen
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Posted: 19 September 2018 at 4:47pm | IP Logged | 2 post reply

I watched an old Hammer film circa the early '70s titled Demons Of the Mind which was fun. Gillian Hills who was in The Owl Service tv series and Blow-Up before that was in it.


Edited by Rebecca Jansen on 19 September 2018 at 4:49pm
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Peter Martin
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Posted: 20 September 2018 at 7:53pm | IP Logged | 3 post reply

Gosh, I've got through a lot recently. Mission Impossibles 4 (2011) and 5 (2015), which were kind of partially satisfying. 5 treads a little too much on the toes of Bond, I feel, though the Bond-esque segment at the Vienna Staatsoper is probably the finest sequence in the film. Rebecca Ferguson made quite the impression. Shame the Bond series couldn't have nabbed her first.

Also got thru Rocky III, which I don't have much new to say about, beyond I noticed how much I like Bill Butler's cinematography this time around.

Then finished watching Taxi Driver (1976) today. Last time I saw this was on a projector in a lecture hall at university 25 years ago and, for me, it stills falls short of its towering reputation. I feel the first portion of the film, illustrating De Niro's kind of low-key isolation is more effective than the extreme violence into which the film careens. Part of my problem with the film are a kind of structural bittiness -- I enjoyed the performances of Cybill Shepherd and Albert Brooks, but then they sort of are left by the wayside and then we get interesting performances from Harvey Keitel and Jodie Foster, but there is virtually no narrative thread between the two. Yes, we are seeing almost a coin flip between those two worlds, in which Travis becomes a hero when we see how close he was to be a bogeyman, but I just don't find it too dramatically satisfying.
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John Byrne
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Posted: 21 September 2018 at 5:55pm | IP Logged | 4 post reply

THE VAMPIRE LOVERS (1970)

One of Hammer’s less inspired offerings. I’ve seen it half a dozen times over the years, and each time I can remember nothing about it!

Peter Cushing wasted in this tripe.

(History: I first saw this movie under curious circumstances. A cable channel in Toronto had started showing softcore porn movies after midnight, under the title “Midnight Blue”. In Calgary the local cable provider decided to do the same, under the title “The Blu-vie Movie”. I kid you not. Censorship being much heavier in Alberta they were mostly limited to regular theatrical movies with a glimpse of nipple or bare bum. Which is how this very tame entry got chosen.)

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Shaun Barry
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Posted: 22 September 2018 at 11:26am | IP Logged | 5 post reply


THE RAVEN (1963)

Almost completely unrecognizable from the Edgar Allan Poe poem, but hugely enjoyable, just the same.  My daughter and I laughed out loud many times, during our first-time viewing last night.

Fun stuff, great cast, gorgeous presentation on Blu-ray from Scream Factory.


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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 23 September 2018 at 10:18am | IP Logged | 6 post reply

A QUIET PLACE (2018)

A gripping and compelling horror film told from the perspective of a family living in a world where they have to be silent; if people aren't silent, creatures hone in on their sound and kill them.

There are some illogical things in the movie - the woman gets pregnant, why would you do that in a world where sound is deadly? - but it works well enough, and there are great performances from the cast.
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Shaun Barry
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Posted: 25 September 2018 at 8:21pm | IP Logged | 7 post reply


SOLO: A STAR WARS STORY (2018)

This should have been light, breezy & fun, coming-in at a lean & mean, no bullsh*t 1 hr. & 45 min.

Instead, we get 2 hrs. & 15 min. of meandering, plodding fanwank of ridiculous levels, overstuffed with too many characters, too many subplots, too many origin points to tick off, and set pieces & sequences that take forever to resolve themselves (seriously, who the hell edited this thing??).

I didn't hate it when I saw it in the theaters, and I don't hate it now, but I definitely like it a whole lot less, the second time around.

Completely unnecessary and pointless.




Edited by Shaun Barry on 25 September 2018 at 8:33pm
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John Byrne
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Posted: 25 September 2018 at 8:56pm | IP Logged | 8 post reply

It’s okay not to like something. That can still be dozens upon dozens of layers away from “hate”.
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Bill Collins
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Posted: 25 September 2018 at 9:49pm | IP Logged | 9 post reply

Watched Solo on Monday, i found it to be pretty
average.The female droid that a lot of people raved
about, was more irritating than funny, it was done
better in Rogue One.A lot of Easter Eggs squeezed into
the plot, which was a fairly average heist movie.It
occurred to me during the chase at the beginning, are
Land Speeder`s so-called because they can`t float over
water?

Edited by Bill Collins on 26 September 2018 at 11:45am
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Steve De Young
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Posted: 26 September 2018 at 12:14pm | IP Logged | 10 post reply

I saw Solo for the first time last night.  I think Honest Trailers nailed it when they said it was a movie adaptation of Han Solo's Wikipedia page.  Less of an adventure, more of just throwing every known detail of his backstory up on screen without even very many twists.  It was okay.  I don't regret having watched it.  Don't know that I'll watch it again.
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John Byrne
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Posted: 26 September 2018 at 7:31pm | IP Logged | 11 post reply

BALLS OF FURY (2007)

Low brow but funny.

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James Woodcock
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Posted: 27 September 2018 at 11:32pm | IP Logged | 12 post reply

Re Robbie’s comments & A QUIET PLACE. people get pregnant for many reasons, some planned, some unplanned.

In the context of what happens earlier in the film, I can fully understand why someone would get pregnant.
Indeed, if no one did get pregnant in that scenario, the human race would be dead within a generation.
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John Byrne
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Posted: 28 September 2018 at 7:33am | IP Logged | 13 post reply

DOWN PERISCOPE (1996)

Another one that's low brow but funny. Terrific cast of character actors.

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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 28 September 2018 at 12:48pm | IP Logged | 14 post reply

 James Woodcock wrote:
Re Robbie’s comments & A QUIET PLACE. people get pregnant for many reasons, some planned, some unplanned.

In the context of what happens earlier in the film, I can fully understand why someone would get pregnant.
Indeed, if no one did get pregnant in that scenario, the human race would be dead within a generation.

I know what you mean, James, but in that world, it'd be a risk that would almost certainly result in some deaths. Not everyone would have the means or know-how to create soundproof rooms.

I think I'd be finding ways to defeat the invaders before considering "be fruitful and multiply..." ;-)
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Shaun Barry
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Posted: 01 October 2018 at 3:47pm | IP Logged | 15 post reply


Halloweentime around our household officially kicks into high gear on October 1st!

FRANKENSTEIN MEETS THE WOLF MAN (1943)
One of the better ones of the myriad Universal sequels, follow-ups or team-ups.  More stylish and moodier than most, even if Bela Legosi is ultimately a poor choice as the Frankenstein Monster.

And later tonight:
THE HAUNTING (1963)
Seems to get a little drier with each passing year, but still an all-time favorite, probably one of my Top 2 picks for best horror film of the '60s.




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John Byrne
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Posted: 01 October 2018 at 6:20pm | IP Logged | 16 post reply

FANTASTIC VOYAGE (1965)

It loses a little of its magic with every passing year, but fortunately I can still access some of my younger self’s sense of wonder.

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Shaun Barry
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Posted: 02 October 2018 at 11:00am | IP Logged | 17 post reply


Zombie double-feature:

George A. Romero's NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD (1968)
More thoughts on this one in the Movies forum... pretty much a given at this point that this is the single most influential horror film of the 1960's.  There's no stopping it, even 50 years later!

Jacques Tourneur's I WALKED WITH A ZOMBIE (1943)
An unfortunate title for a film, perhaps, but it gets my vote as the eeriest, spookiest horror entry from the 1940s, a decade that isn't exactly overflowing with genuinely unnerving entries.



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Peter Martin
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Posted: 02 October 2018 at 6:02pm | IP Logged | 18 post reply

I watched the Quincy Jones documentary on Netflix Quincy.

The man's accomplishments are very impressive, and there's quite a few interesting things that I didn't know (having to give up playing the trumpet for health reasons, for example). A pretty decent documentary.
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Shaun Barry
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Posted: 06 October 2018 at 2:36pm | IP Logged | 19 post reply


John Carpenter's THE FOG (1980)

My personal favorite of all of Carpenter's films, and my vote for the perfect Halloween pick for October--ironically enough, even moreso than that other film he's noted for!



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Peter Martin
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Posted: 06 October 2018 at 5:49pm | IP Logged | 20 post reply

Shaun, I often have some major overlap with your view on films, but The Fog would just about scrape into my top 5 Carpenter films. I view The Thing as a perfect film and I have a head-over-heels relationship with Big Trouble in Little China.

I watched Murder on the Orient Express (1974) and it was great fun.

First of all let me just express my admiration for Sydney Lumet. What a filmmaker he was! So many great films that were very different. He had buckets and buckets of talent in those two vital areas of telling a story visually and coaxing strong performances from his cast members.

Second this film made me realise how much I like Albert Finney. The first time I remember taking note of him was in 1990's The Green Man, so I've been watching him for close to 30 years, but over the years he has slowly grown in my admiration to this point where I think: wow, genuine great.

He is, perhaps, unique amongst this cast as he plays against his natural inclinations.

The cast is excellent, perhaps because they do generally play to type. Given the brevity of the screen time allotted to each, this is a smart move. Vanessa Redgrave and John Gielgud both particularly run with it in this area. Redgrave does so much with just a glance a smile.

The most remarkable of all, perhaps, is Ingrid Bergman, though. Her performance largely consists of one continuously-shot scene.  And it is a remarkable thing to watch, indeed. As a whole it is a remarkable piece of old-school storytelling. Lumet is much missed.


Edited by Peter Martin on 06 October 2018 at 5:52pm
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Shaun Barry
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Posted: 06 October 2018 at 6:06pm | IP Logged | 21 post reply


(Peter, the 1982 THING would be an extremely close second place, in terms of Carpenter films... though while I understand its cult status, I have never been able to get into BIG TROUBLE.  Hard to explain why, but it has never clicked with me, for some reason!)



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Peter Martin
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Posted: 06 October 2018 at 6:52pm | IP Logged | 22 post reply

Fair enough. I saw it in the cinema back in those heady days of the eighties, and was turned head over heels by the way its mysterious story unfolded, its curious mix of genres and its gleeful sending up of its western hero. Even better, I found that when I revisited it on DVD a couple of decades later it totally stood up to my more mature sensibilities. My girlfriend even liked it, who has an instinctive dislike of 'old' films (films even from the 90s are old to her) and of fantasy/sci-fi/horror/costume drama (several black marks there).

Visiting San Fran's Chinatown was a major disappointment after the foggy, supernatural depiction in this film!
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John Byrne
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Posted: 06 October 2018 at 7:17pm | IP Logged | 23 post reply

I fell asleep in the theater watching THE FOG, but I am a huge fan of both THE THING and BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 06 October 2018 at 9:01pm | IP Logged | 24 post reply

Ditto. THE THING and BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA are two of my favorite films, period. 

I’m pleased as punch that both films—which failed at the box office—eventually found their audience.
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 06 October 2018 at 9:04pm | IP Logged | 25 post reply

As an aside, I was recently reminded of this. It’s rather dated, now, but still a lot of fun. And, hey, James Hong cameo!

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