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Topic: What disc did you have in last (and what did you think)? Post ReplyPost New Topic
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Stéphane Garrelie
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Posted: 09 August 2017 at 2:27am | IP Logged | 1 post reply

...and produced by John Wayne (but Budd Boetticher was the one in charge and, from memory, when he said to Wayne "who's in charge you or me?" John Wayne said "It is you", then Wayne talked to the team and said "This man as all my trust to direct this movie" and never came back on the set.) Yes, Peter, Seven Men From Now is a wonderful movie and it is one of my all time favorites.

Form me i saw Antoine Fuqua's remake of The Magnificient Seven: it feels as much and maybe more, like a new movie in the series (and one of the bests) than a remake. I liked it a lot. 


Edited by Stéphane Garrelie on 09 August 2017 at 2:41am
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Peter Martin
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Posted: 09 August 2017 at 7:05am | IP Logged | 2 post reply

I love that STAR WARS too took its time -- Luke doesn't appear until 17 minutes into the movie, and well over a half hour before Obi-Wan tells him about the Force.
----------------------------------------------
Down to a genius editing job. Marcia Lucas fought for the early Luke scenes to stay in, which she had worked on. George overruled her (and it was the same story with the Jabba scene, with Harrison Ford also fighting to keep the scene. Lucas instead porting some of the necessary dialogue into the Han/Greedo scene). The editing team won Oscars for their troubles.

"In the first five minute, we were hitting everybody with more information than they could handle. There were too many story-lines to keep straight," said Richard Chew, one of that 3-person Oscar-winning team.
"It also made the picture a lot weirder, because the main characters became the robots, which is a wonderful idea."
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Greg Kirkman
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Posted: 09 August 2017 at 9:58am | IP Logged | 3 post reply

STAR WARS was absolutely a movie which was saved in editing. And, as a result of trimming down on unnecessary scenes, you get that clean a d simple narrative line: the droids take us to Luke, who takes us to Ben, who takes us to Chewie, who takes us to Han, who takes us to the Falcon, which takes us to the Death Star and Leia.
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Shaun Barry
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Posted: 09 August 2017 at 5:49pm | IP Logged | 4 post reply


KONG: SKULL ISLAND (2017)

Saw this in the theaters this past spring, and picked up a copy on the way home last night.  Lots of big, dumb fun... certainly better than the last Peter Jackson attempt, and my son's first real, intense, modern monster film.  He loves it!

I can easily watch this a few more times.





Edited by Shaun Barry on 09 August 2017 at 5:50pm
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James Best
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Posted: 09 August 2017 at 7:17pm | IP Logged | 5 post reply

JOHN WICK (2014)

I had heard good things about the movie from friends and co-workers so I checked it out for some guilt-free action thriller fun.

Enjoyed it enough to where I will likely check out the sequel. It's not brain food but it's perfect for popcorn. And I have to say that I really liked Keanu Reeves in the lead role. I hadn't seen him onscreen in a very, very long time but I enjoyed his performance as the titular character.

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Pete York
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Posted: 09 August 2017 at 9:55pm | IP Logged | 6 post reply

 Stéphane wrote:
...and produced by John Wayne (but Budd Boetticher was the one in charge and, from memory, when he said to Wayne "who's in charge you or me?" John Wayne said "It is you", then Wayne talked to the team and said "This man as all my trust to direct this movie" and never came back on the set.)

Yes! This comes up in Scott Eyman's excellent Wayne biography. He had a lot of respect for Boetticher and maybe this is what plagued some of the other, lesser Batjac movies--Wayne sort of domineering the set.


TONY ROME (1967) D: Gordon Douglas

This is an incredible, incredible, incredible snapshot of a time and place, namely Miami, late '60s, with Sinatra exerting minimal effort. It's not what anyone would call "good", but could be fun if you're in the mood. Good cast (Gena Rowlands, Simon Oakland, Richard Conte, Jill St. John [insert Tex Avery .gif]) and Sinatra cronies (Shecky Greene, Rocky Graziano) along for the ride.



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Shaun Barry
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Posted: 10 August 2017 at 7:03pm | IP Logged | 7 post reply


Mel Brooks' SILENT MOVIE (1976)

First time ever seeing this one... certainly doesn't approach the same heights of THE PRODUCERS, YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN, or BLAZING SADDLES, but not worthless, either.

Lots of shameless mugging (kind of a necessity for this film), but good, silly fun, if you're in the mood.

And Bernadette Peters, in her late 20's.  Yowza...



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John Byrne
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Posted: 11 August 2017 at 3:10pm | IP Logged | 8 post reply

BICENTENNIAL MAN (1999)

Every time I see this I wonder what it would have been like with someone less cloying than Robin Williams in the lead.

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Shaun Barry
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Posted: 11 August 2017 at 4:13pm | IP Logged | 9 post reply


(I still remember the original trailers for that film being especially cringe-worthy, JB.  Even after Williams' passing, I've still managed to avoid BICENTENNIAL MAN... just no interest.)



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John Byrne
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Posted: 11 August 2017 at 5:14pm | IP Logged | 10 post reply

The worst part is that after Andrew the robot turns human, he turns into Robin Williams, and the "humor" becomes juvenile. I wonder what someone like Brad Pitt or Leonardo DiCaprio would have done with it.
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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 11 August 2017 at 6:11pm | IP Logged | 11 post reply

It's definitely a film of "two halves". I enjoy the first half, but not the second half. 
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James Best
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Posted: 12 August 2017 at 10:05am | IP Logged | 12 post reply

JACK REACHER: Never Go Back (2016)

Not even Cobie Smulders as the female lead could save this one. And that is saying a lot, believe me.

I think it is time for Tom Cruise to find some other toys to play with. I know he likes the Jack Reacher novels and treats the films as his own pet projects. But when you have a $96 million budget and you only get $59M in ticket sales. That should tell you that the well has gone dry.
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John Byrne
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Beam Me Up, Scotty!

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Posted: 12 August 2017 at 11:44am | IP Logged | 13 post reply

Tom Cruise looks in a mirror and sees Jack Reacher.

What does that tell us about Hollywood?

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Steve Coates
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Posted: 12 August 2017 at 2:09pm | IP Logged | 14 post reply

Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children (2016)
I'd have to say it has a good balance between fantasy and science fiction. If only the X-Men movies were as good.
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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 12 August 2017 at 4:48pm | IP Logged | 15 post reply

MANEATER (2015)

I thought man-eater had a hyphen! Oh well...

Plot: research facility in Alaska has injected a polar bear with wolf DNA. And made its strength increase. All part of some environmental initiative (I didn't understand). Bear escapes. Shortly after, a photographer arrives in Alaska with his models to do a winter-themed photo shoot. They stay at a lodge. You can guess what happens next. ;-)

The tropes are here - as are the stereotypes. Horror wouldn't be horror without narcissistic characters or the experienced hunter. There's also a dippy woman or two.

It's fairly entertaining. The special effects are inconsistent. Sometimes you see what I *think* are model shots that work effectively; at other times, we are seeing something akin to Paint on Windows 95. But the film does wisely show us the bear only a few times. A shadow here or there among the trees is very effective.

I bought this for £1 in a bargain bin. For £1, I am not complaining. It's pretty good fun.
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Jason Scott
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Posted: 13 August 2017 at 11:52am | IP Logged | 16 post reply

BICENTENNIAL MAN (1999)

Like many others I too have found this a film of two halves. I'm probably really biased towards the first half because I originally read the book around the time I was watching the mini series Kane & Abel, and ended up imagining Sam Neil as EXACTLY the character he was later cast as in the film! Which is as bizarre a coincidence as I've ever encountered.

My main points of contention with the adaption is that in the novella, if I remember correctly, Andrew is repulsed by the fact that Little Miss's grand daughter looks just like her. Thus he certainly doesn't strike up a romantic relationship with her.
Then on his death bed, he is trying to have his last thought be that he has been declared a man. But instead his last thought is of the real Little Miss.

I feel like the film missed the point that it is these little less than perfect moments for Andrew that actually make him human.

A shame because there was a lot to admire in the rest of the film. But those differences ruined it as an adaption for me. Maybe it plays better for folks that didn't read the original story?


Edited by Jason Scott on 13 August 2017 at 11:53am
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Shaun Barry
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Posted: 13 August 2017 at 6:09pm | IP Logged | 17 post reply


SUPERBAD (2007) - "Unrated Extended Edition"

The '70s soundtrack & visual aesthetic, in a modern setting, is an odd choice, and it's certainly one of the most foul-mouthed and raunchy major studio comedies I've ever seen...

...but it's also gut-bustingly funny, and probably a Top 10 comedy favorite of mine, from the '00s.

(Over the last few days, I needed the laughs.)





Edited by Shaun Barry on 13 August 2017 at 6:30pm
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Pete York
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Posted: 13 August 2017 at 10:39pm | IP Logged | 18 post reply

UNFAITHFULLY YOURS (1948) D: Preston Sturges

One of the more audacious efforts of the studio era. I guess the audience just wasn't ready for a dark comedy about a world-famous conductor (Rex Harrison, immense) who, during a concert, fantasizes about killing his wife (Linda Darnell) for her alleged infidelity. Masterpiece!

TENGOKU TO JIGOKU / HIGH AND LOW (1963) D: Akira Kurosawa

Gripping police procedural, adapted from an Ed McBain novel. The premise of the kidnapping twist caught Kurosawa's eye. Mifune superb as the executive. My favorite from AK outside the jidaigeki.

YOUNG AND INNOCENT (1937) D: Alfred Hitchcock

On his birthday, lighter fare from Hitchcock (some it funny rather than typically droll) compared to similar iterations of the man on the run like THE 39 STEPS or SABOTEUR. Famous crane shot to reveal the murderer.     

  
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Shaun Barry
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Posted: 14 August 2017 at 12:43pm | IP Logged | 19 post reply


CHICAGO (2002)

One of my all-time favorite movie musicals, and one of the best films I saw in the theaters, back in the '00s.



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Robbie Parry
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Posted: 14 August 2017 at 2:00pm | IP Logged | 20 post reply

I am not a fan of musicals, Shaun, but that one was pretty enjoyable. I liked the performances, the songs, the atmosphere and the sets. All good. 
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Bill Collins
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Posted: 14 August 2017 at 2:31pm | IP Logged | 21 post reply

All 5 Omen films,from good to bad to why remake a
classic?It did occur to me that getting the anti-Christ
into The Whitehouse was rather prescient.
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Shaun Barry
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Posted: 14 August 2017 at 3:21pm | IP Logged | 22 post reply


Robbie, I can't even say I'm a huge fan of the movie-musical genre as a whole, either... if you take away holiday films and Disney/kids flicks, the list of my (mostly) unqualified musical favorites can be counted on one hand.

But CHICAGO would certainly be in my #2 or #3 slot!



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Shaun Barry
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Posted: 14 August 2017 at 4:13pm | IP Logged | 23 post reply


Wow, all 5 in a row, Bill?  How has THE FINAL CONFLICT held up after all these years?  I remember being somewhat fascinated with it as a kid, back when it was an HBO mainstay in the early '80s... but I've never seen it again since.



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Pete York
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Posted: 14 August 2017 at 9:14pm | IP Logged | 24 post reply

AMERICAN MADNESS (1932) D: Frank Capra

This is very nearly Capra's first great film, in no small part due to Walter Huston as the humanist bank manager at odds with his board. Reckless rumours, mob mentality, a run on the bank (a highlight)--Capra will famously revisit these in a later movie. If this is the dry run, it's quite good on its own. Pat O'Brien also excellent as the head teller.  
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Bill Collins
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Posted: 15 August 2017 at 12:13am | IP Logged | 25 post reply

Shaun,It was a box set i bought cheap a fair few years
ago and never got round to watching,we`ve been
watching a film per night over the last week with a
couple of nights off to break it up.The Final Conflict
i had only seen upon release too,it has held up ok,but
the lack of inventive deaths that were a mainstay of
the first two makes it a bit boring.The Awakening has
a female anti-Christ,and has the look/feel of a TV
movie.The remake is just that,basically the same
script as the original,just more up to date effects,i
did smile at the casting of Mia Farrow from Rosemary`s
Baby!One thing never made clear...why did the church
kill a newborn and substitute a child born of a
jackal,that was never going to end well was it?

Edited by Bill Collins on 15 August 2017 at 12:14am
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